Book Review: A Light in the Darkness

While in graduate school, I moved away from pleasure reading while in because any time spent reading for fun was taking away from research and writing. It was a bad habit/mindset I allowed myself to fall into and wanting to change. In order to shift into reading more books again, I am trying to read and review one book a month that relates to the blog’s theme. January is about finding ways to make small improvements with a chronic illness, so it made sense to review Lisa A. Sniderman’s book A Light in the Darkness.

Lisa details her journey through the diagnosis, coping with a chronic illness and the roadblocks the illness places before her. Lisa also highlights the importance of making simple changes as a means of healing and coping with the illness. I rather enjoyed reading Lisa’s story and hopefully you will take the opportunity to do so as well.


Note: I was approached to review this book, though I received no compensation to do so. All links are unaffiliated and I receive no monetary benefit by providing them.


Book Information

Title: A Light in the Darkness
Author: Lisa A. Sniderman
Date Published: 2018
Publisher: Crimson Cloak Publishing
Pages: 128
Genre: Non-Fiction, Inspirational

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Book Review: Free to Learn

As Jai grew more active, figuring out how to teach him effectively and prepare him for preschool became increasingly important as a parent. How to teach him was the trick…do I sit down with flashcards or do I let the learning happen more naturally based on his desires and interest?

First disclosure: I decided to do the unscientific thing and go with my gut over how I thought best to teach him: through play.

Parenting on instinct is important because no one knows their children better than a parent, but it can be problematic if not done responsibly. I rationalize that teaching a child through play will at best give him the tools he needs to learn complex concepts and at worst delays him for a year on milestone concepts, but nothing that can’t be made up with some rigor.

That said, if I was going to take this tactic of teaching style, I would need to find advice and experts to back it up. Second disclosure: I engaged in confirmation bias as I looked for tools to justify allowing my child to play all day without creating strict structure.

That’s how I stumbled upon Peter Gray’s book, Free to Learn. In my research on the book, I found that he highlighted the importance of allowing what comes naturally to children as a means to learn a variety of important life concepts and lessons.

What follows is my review of a book I chose on my own. I did not receive any compensation for this review.

Book Information

Title: Free to Learn
Author: Peter Gray
Date Published: 2013
Publisher: Basic Books
Pages: 274
Genre: Psychology
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