A Return & Refocus

I spent the last month prepping and figuring out how to manage our new life in self-quarantine. Learning to adjust with a new normal? Something I’m used to with a Chronic Illness. I got this.

So far, we stayed safe and healthy. We are minimizing travel away from home as much as possible. I’ve reduced our movements more and more, stretching out the time between grocery store trips. 

I am currently going on Day 8 since the last store trip. I am hoping to make it to at least April 20 before needing to go back out again. We’re even minimizing deliveries from major online retailers.

It hasn’t been easy, and because of needing to make adjustments, it took me a while to settle into a new routine that included blog writing. I am hoping that I will be able to blog more frequently now that I have 1: more time and 2: more time.

Keeping Busy in a Pandemic

Keeping busy and focused at this time helps. I’ve taken advantage of the time to work on a couple of my goals for 2020. Back in December, I wanted to figure out a better daily schedule for myself. I’ve talked about finding workable time-management strategies before, and now was the time to hone it.

I understand that this is a unique situation. The daily schedule I set up for myself may not be feasible once we start getting back to it, but maybe if I do it long enough, I will find a way to adjust when things return to normal.

What I did was this: create a color-coordinated block schedule for myself, detailing all the different tasks I wanted to each day of the week. Have I stuck with it 100%? No. But I do try to stick to it as much as possible and be gentle when I get taken away to do a different task. That is key, and this schedule is a guideline to help keep me focused, not something to stress me out.

I also settled on a weekly to-do list. Pulled from Day Designer (not a sponsored link), I make adjustments to the Weekly Planner design every Monday and use that sheet for the whole week. I put down to-do items for the appropriate day as I think about them and then work off of that list for the day.

I find that this keeps me super productive throughout the week. When I feel productive, I feel better, mentally, and emotionally. I still have my moments where I feel particularly stressed over everything. Still, I do feel like I am making the best of the current situation. 

Going with the Flow

If the global slowdown reinforced anything with me, it’s the need to go with the flow. I was unable to focus on my writing during the last month as I prepped my family, managed my health, and figured out what we needed during this time. I decided that I was okay with this because I had to be. My health and my family comes first, and if it meant temporarily sacrificing something, then I would do it

I could either fight what was going on, or I could keep moving forward.

Fighting would mean more stress and frustration. Plus, what is there to fight? My favorite restaurant cannot do dine-in, so why be mad at them? Holding onto that anger of the injustice of it does me no good and only increases my stress. 

When I accept that I am not able to go where I want to go, run with who I want to run with, and do things as I usually do, I feel a less intense emotional pull. 

Yes, this is a frustrating situation. Yes, having feelings of anger are entirely valid and reasonable. But holding onto those feelings without providing a productive outlet only serves to poison me, not help me. Accepting that I have no control over this situation grants me a modicum of control. 

Best Laid Plans…

As a general blog policy, I like to have a theme for the year and sub-themes for each month. It keeps me focused, but allows me to explore different facets of each topic. I had ideas for balance and harmony in 2020, but when the pandemic hit, all was cast aside. I couldn’t focus on themes, research, and writing while preparing.

Now that I’ve found my stride, I still can’t. Not because I don’t want to, but it doesn’t seem appropriate. How can I write about balance and harmony when the whole world, without hyperbole, is out of balance? It looks rather privileged and lacking self-awareness.

So I’ve had to take a step back, for the time being, scrap my original plans and refocus for the next few months.

A Temporary Refocus

For the next few months, I am going to go without a theme. Instead, I am going to be writing about what I am thinking, feeling, and doing at this time. Both as a parent and as a person with a Chronic Illness. I am going to maintain my general position: self-care, self-compassion, and focusing on health.

I am not going to hide from what is going on, but rather embrace it. Some posts will be directly related to the pandemic, and other posts will be pandemic adjacent. As I said above, it’s essential to go with the flow, which is what I will be doing for the time being.

I hope you all are staying safe and healthy at this time and that you do what’s best for you to maintain your mental and emotional health.

Attention to Chronic Illness Bloggers!

The MS Mommy Blog is looking to collaborate with other chronic illness bloggers for this year. If you have a chronic illness blog and would like an opportunity to tap into the MS Mommy Blog audience, please contact me here. I look forward to hearing from you.


Please consider supporting the MS Mommy Blog by buying a cup of coffee. If you find my content helpful, a little support helps keep the blog going.

Like this post? Make sure to follow me on your favorite social media platform and show some love by sharing it. Links found below.

Featured photo credit: Canva


MS-Mommy-Blog-Update

300th Post & Blog Update

It’s the 300th MS Mommy Blog post! I didn’t imagine ever reaching this point when I first started my blog nearly three years ago. I assumed I would lose interest. A big thank you to all my followers. I appreciate all of you. In honor of this milestone post, I wanted to provide some interesting facts about the blog and an update about the future of the MS Mommy Blog.

Interesting Facts about the Blog

These are some of the current insights I wanted to share. It’s all modest, as I am a small-time blogger with limited resources. But I am proud of it.

  • The current most popular post is “Early Childhood Education Blogs
  • The most popular post of all-time is “The First Couple of Days…” with 390 total views
  • March is always my most popular month (MS Awareness)
  • I average between 1,100-1,200 words with each post
  • I’ve re-branded the blog three times: tracking my health changes, focusing on motherhood, and finally healthy living with a chronic illness
  • The three top countries of visitors: United States, United Kingdom, and Canada

The Future of the Blog

So while a 300th post is something to celebrate, I am finding it harder to keep it up as I would like. Partially because the blog costs a lot financially, mentally, and physically for me to maintain.

I put a lot of work into writing each post. I am providing a service to people struggling with a chronic illness, specifically MS, with each post. I want people recently diagnosed to see there are options. MS and chronic disease is not a death sentence. It’s a chance to embrace resiliency and learn to adapt to a new normal.

This is a service I am providing for free. The ad revenue on my blog will not payout for years. Maybe this means that I am offering a service nobody wants, and I understand that. I still want to provide it in some capacity. But I cannot do it the way I’ve been going. 

I struggle to ask for money, and I tend to undervalue my work because of it. I know there are options for me as a blogger, but I do not have the time to pursue them. I had a Ko-Fi page at one point but never pushed it because I struggle to ask readers to help.

With that said, if the financial support of the blog does not change, I must reconsider how much time I put into the blog. With all the significant changes I’ve dealt with these past few months, I recognize that I may need to re-prioritize my time.

What this means is the frequency of my posting may go down to once or twice a week. I am hoping to maintain consistency with the content themes, though I feel like February is a little haphazard. If the blog does start to bring in more income, my posting frequency will be more consistent, reflecting demand. 

So, if you ever found my writing useful or comforting, please consider contributing a few dollars through my Ko-Fi page. If you are unable to donate, please share my blog whenever a post resonates with you to friends and family. It helps my blog grow.

All of this is a good thing. I am not sad, and I am not disappointed. I am honest with myself and with you about my capabilities. I love writing what I write, and I plan to continue to do so, it just may change over the next few months.

Thank you to everyone who’s followed my blog from the beginning and to all the supporters I’ve built along the way. I appreciate every one of you even if I don’t say it or respond to your comments. Here’s to another 300 posts (even if it takes five more years).

Attention to Chronic Illness Bloggers!

The MS Mommy Blog is looking to collaborate with other chronic illness bloggers for this year. If you have a chronic illness blog and would like an opportunity to tap into the MS Mommy Blog audience, please contact me here. I look forward to hearing from you.


Like this post? Make sure to follow me on your favorite social media platform and show some love by sharing it. Links found below.

Featured photo credit: Canva



Happy Holidays

From our family to yours: we hope your holidays are sweet and bright. Stay safe, and may you be blessed with the spirit of the season.


Like this post? Make sure to follow me on your favorite social media platform and show some love by sharing it. Links found below.

Featured photo credit: Canva


Love & MS

This post was originally published in February 2018. I’ve updated it to include a follow up since the original publication.


We don’t get to choose whether or not we get MS, nor do we get to decide when we get that diagnosis. For some, it comes while in a relationship, and for others, it happens outside of one.

Either scenario forces the following self-reflectiondoes my partner stay with me? And, do I disclose my situation on a date? MS is challenging because it turns partners or potential partners into caretakers.

It fosters self-doubt after the diagnosisis my partner with me because they feel obligated? Do they resent having to care for me? Are they only interested in me because they have to “fix” me? What happens if they leave or die before me?

It is little wonder that many bloggers and experts refer to MS as the third wheel in a relationship. It’s an unwanted obstacle that can put a strain on any current or budding relationship.

The Third Wheel

MS is the unpredictable cousin that comes into your life and needs a place to crash until they get on their feet. They take up space on a centrally located couch and refuse to leave when you want to watch a movie with your partner (or bring a date home). They say they are looking for a job, but really spend all day watching half-hour courtroom shows with ads for injury lawyers.

It’s that cousin that interrupts you every time you want to have a conversation with someone. Because of the interruption, you forget what you were saying and get frustrated because you can’t remember.

Simply put: MS is an unwelcome third-party to your relationship that isn’t going to leave anytime soon. No matter how many times you ask it to get its act together and move on.

Trying to figure MS out and how it factors into a relationship is extremely hard. In addition to maintaining a relationship, I am trying to learn my limitations. How much do I put on or ask of Ash? Should I even ask him to help? Is the relationship lopsided? Am I really that bad that I need his help? Or am I just imagining things?

MS is always hiding in the background of every thought or action I take. I have to plan out my day to make sure I have enough energy for when Ash gets home to make any interactions with him meaningful. I have to pause frequently and ask myself: am I feeling this way because this is normal for someone who only got 4 hours of sleep with a teething toddler, or is this because of the MS?

As you can see, I ask myself a lot of questions. I tend to overthink things, and so it takes a lot of energy to manage my MS. So when it is time for quality time with Ash, sometimes I just don’t have what it takes to be the partner I think he deserves.

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