Have a Healthy Summer

For most of my adulthood at the beginning of each year, I fell into the mental trap of “getting healthy and in shape for the summer.” I wanted to have that perfect beach body, even if we never made it to the beach, and feel comfortable wearing cute summer outfits.

I never succeeded.

Life would get in the way, I would get distracted or frustrated with my diet and exercise and so I would enter summer either at the same weight I was at the beginning of the year or a little bit heavier.

Since I made significant lifestyle changes and stuck with them, I have found that I am finally entering the summer the way I always wanted to: beach ready and several cute outfits.

Still no available beach and rarely do I get out of my “mom uniform” because cute outfits and a toddler do not mix.

But I am experiencing something I’ve never before: staying fitness-minded and motivated in the heat. As I discussed on Monday, having MS and living in a hot and humid climate is not a good combination. I am finding that my motivation and my ability to stay fitness-focused is waning more than it did in the cold winter months.

What do I do? Well, I have to make some adjustments to accommodate this unforeseen speed bump.

Healthy Choices

The main thing I’ve learned is that my choices had to change in the summer months. This can range from the food I eat to the time of day I exercise to the intensity of the exercise I commit myself to complete.

If there is a day where I know I won’t be able to exercise for a while due to the heat, I have to adjust my eating to reflect that. Rather than eating heavier or caloric-dense meals, I adjust to more frequent and lighter meals throughout the day.

If we expect a high heat day or extreme humidity, then I will make sure to get out earlier in the morning to avoid dealing with either. 6:30am is usually a great time to get out, beat the heat and the traffic, and be home in time to say “good-bye” to Ash before he heads to work.

If it’s too hot or humid out to exercise, then I move any sort of workout indoors with the A/C blasting or a fan on me if I need to do something with intensity. I also need to make sure that keep drinking water throughout the day.

The hardest choice to adjust is the first one: I love to eat. So if I am having a craving for something particularly heavy, potatoes of some sort, I want to indulge it. I try to find ways to compromise or satisfy the craving with something else. Popcorn works best, but a cool piece of fruit will do in a pinch.

Remembering to drink enough water can also be a problem for me – so by carrying around a water bottle or cup can help remind me to stay hydrated. I need to keep drinking water if I am going to keep exercising throughout the hotter months.

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Someday Wish: Hiking the Appalachian Trail

Last weekend we went camping by the approach trail for the Appalachian Trail (AT) in the North Georgia mountains.

It was my first time at the approach after hearing so much about this place for twenty+ years. Growing up in New England, particularly next to the AT, you were familiar with the six-month journey from Georgia to Maine. As a child, it was this nebulous start point in the state of Georgia which was a place you didn’t want to spend a lot of time in for various reasons.

For almost ten years to the day I’ve been living in Georgia, but I hadn’t made it close to the start of the AT until now. It was a goal to visit the trailhead (in some capacity) while living in the Southeast.

Growing Up Next to the Trail

As a child, seeing AT hikers was a frequent occurrence in the late-spring into mid-fall. When I was in high school I would see them walking along the road across the street on their way to the next section of trail. Sometimes they would stop on the embankment for a railroad line and some students would shout out the window at them.

Teenagers.

As I got older, I would see them along the road on my way to work. They would come into my place of employment to clean up in the bathroom and re-up their food supplies (it was a great place to shop for the vegan hikers). I never really got into much of a conversation with them as they came through my line, mainly because I didn’t even know what to say. Most left their packs outside, but you could always tell given the tired, dusty look on their faces.

I also hiked sections of the trail, but no more than a few miles at a time. I always enjoyed my time on the trail, but couldn’t imagine what it was like to hike over two thousand miles of the trail.

Someday…

When I found out what these hikers were doing, hiking from Georgia to Maine, I always wanted to try the journey myself. But I always thought myself incapable due to lack of physical fitness. As I got older, I found the idea of exerting myself every day for an extended period of time fatiguing (I blame my undiagnosed MS at the time).

Now that I’ve made significant lifestyle changes and feel better – the idea of going six months of hard physical labor every day no longer seems impossible. I understand there’s a lot of planning and prepping that goes into hiking the entirety of the trail, but I finally have the confidence that one day I will be able to do it.

I have built up my fitness goals. I completed a half-marathon, but I have the following “someday goals”:

  • Run a marathon
  • Compete in a Triathlon
  • Hike the AT
  • Stretch someday: Climb Mount Everest

Having my MS under control will also help my ability to hike the trail. It might take me a little longer than most people, but the more active I get and aware of my daily limitations, I think I could do it. I will have to wait until Jai is older either to take him with me, or he’s out of the house so he can go six-months without needing to see me. Either way, I will need to wait to go with a partner as the trail isn’t safe for a woman to go it alone. I don’t think I could convince Ash to go with me…

In the meantime…

Because it’s going to be several years before I am ready to hike the AT, but I know someone who is currently part of the 2018 AT Class: A Worthwhile Adventure. She’s blogging her journey fairly frequently so it’s enjoyable to see the pictures and read all about the literal ups and downs of her journey. I highly recommend subscribing to her blog to follow her exciting adventure through Appalachia.

What are some of your personal fitness or adventure goals? Would you ever spend six months on such a goal? Leave a comment below.


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Featured photo credit: Michelle Melton Photography


Recovering with Nature

When I began my health journey nearly a year ago, I wasn’t sure what direction I would take. Honestly, I thought I would give up, go back to my old habits, and be on MS medication by now.

In the back of my mind, I had very few pleasures: eating sugar, fried foods, and not exercising.  These were things I did to self-sooth and help me cope with stress and my diagnosis.

It was my pattern. To try something new, get discouraged, and then give up on it.

This particular venture worked out differently. I think because I am blogging it allows for a level of accountability, perhaps if I didn’t maintain this blog I would have given up sooner. Back in November, I went through a period where I didn’t post as often as I wanted. It may have been discouragement (“is this something really worth doing? I am putting a lot of time into something with little to no feedback”), but I think I was also just busy with life and not sure if I wanted to continue regardless.

Somehow I stuck through it and I’ve continued to notice positive changes. I’ve lost weight, I feel happier, I feel more balanced, and I think I’ve fully accepted my diagnosis. I was on the path of acceptance several years ago, but I really embodied the “things I cannot change” attitude since August.

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Taking a Phone Detox

When Jai wakes up in the morning ready to be taken out of bed, the first thing Ash reaches for is his glasses. The first thing I reach for is my phone.

I wish I could say it’s because I have a bunch of important messages that I need to check from overnight. But it’s not.

The main reason I feel the need to instantly check my phone is for a resource/time management game and social media sites like Facebook or Reddit. I need to see what happened overnight, make necessary adjustments, comment, upvote, downvote, like, subscribe… I need to interact with the digital medium.

And then respond to any important messages.

None of what I am doing is so imperative that it must be the first thing I do when I wake up in the morning.

My name is Deborah and I am addicted to my phone.

I am not being flippant about this, I genuinely believe I have an addiction to my phone (and technology). This has been a long-standing addiction, something I’ve dealt with since before Jai was born. I believe my addiction got worse due to countless hours of breastfeeding when Jai was a newborn and never scaled back as he got older.

When you are stuck with a little one on your breast with nowhere to go, reading and interacting on your phone is the easiest and most entertaining means to pass the time.

Now that he is more aware of what is going on, I need to be mindful of my phone usage, particularly around him.

I have this overwhelming fear he’s going to get the message that he’s less important than my phone. With my current phone/technology usage – it’s unavoidable.


This post isn’t about shaming parents who use technology, it’s about my problematic usage of technology and an attempt to have a healthier relationship with it. This post isn’t about passing judgment on others’ technology usage, but an examination of my own.

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