a-higher-power-to-help-manage-a-chronic-illness

A Higher Power with a Chronic Illness

Approximately 84% of the world’s population is religious in some way. The number may be lower if we compare those who say they are religious, versus those who actively practice. It is safe to assume that the majority of the world has some sort of religious background. For many people, when dealing with a crisis or celebration of some sort, they reach to a higher power. This higher power connects humans to one another, reaffirms the community bond, and provides comfort in times of need. When dealing with a chronic illness, sometimes that higher power provides the strength needed to cope.

For September, the MS Mommy Blog will discuss the advantages, and at times the disadvantages, of having a higher power during a wellness journey. If you have one deity, more than one, or none at all, you’ll find that I will touch upon your situation at least once this month.

A Quick Disclaimer

If I linked you back to this post, it’s because of the following disclaimer.

The MS Mommy Blog takes a strict stance of not promoting one particular religious practice over another, nor will it disparage a specific system of belief. If I take lessons from one philosophy more often than another, it is not an endorsement.

Because this month will have a lot of conversations surrounding religion, I will be as broad and general as possible to be inclusive. If I do use specific examples or terminology associated with one particular religion, it won’t be to promote it over another. This has everything to do with the limitation of the English language and tap into Western cultural shortcuts.

All examples will be done in an honoring way: I will not criticize any particular system of belief. I will, however, address some of the mental traps we fall into as a result of religion, not because of the religion itself. This might be perceived as a criticism, but please do not take it as such.

To be all-encompassing, I will not be using the word “god” in any capacity. Instead, I will use the term “higher power” or “greater cause.” If you have a particular deity, that is your higher power. If you are not religious or an adherent to a traditional belief system, you might have a greater cause that you focus on (see humanism as an example of what I mean).

Looking Beyond Ourselves

Often, at the start of any wellness journey, there’s a call to look beyond ourselves. We might reach out to our higher power to help us start or give us the strength to move forward. Being afraid to try something new, no matter how beneficial it may be, is reason enough to need strength from wherever you can get it. If you are not religious, you may look for other motivations: a child, a partner, or just for yourself.

Whatever the reason, we are looking within to look beyond.

The act of asking a higher power for strength or finding a greater cause allows us to reflect on our life from an objective perspective. We can see ourselves as others see us, and see where we might need an extra boost. Then we can ask for help from our higher power, or see resources related to our greater cause. The act of asking for help is a form of externalizing our desire and can help propel us forward.

I often find that looking beyond myself helps. It’s usually in the form of providing an example to Jai, I see what I want him to do, and therefore, I must model my behavior, so he follows suit. I am looking beyond myself to make changes in my wellness journey, and I find more success because of it.

Finding Motivation Beyond, Maybe

If you grew up in a particular system of belief or are newly converted, you know what works for you. If reaching out to your higher power gets you the answers and comfort you need, then do so. But make sure whatever response you get back is honest and healthy. Sometimes we get a specific response (or lack of response), and it may not be our higher power, but our unconscious getting in the way. That’s the “maybe” in this section’s header.

If you are not receiving comfort or an answer encouraging your personal wellness, seek out a second opinion. Find a leader you trust within your belief community and seek counsel. Understand that they are fallible too, but your higher power should want you to be strong, find comfort, and be healthy. Your leader should help you get a more honest response that isn’t muddled with unconscious and discouraging thoughts.

No Excuses

Here’s where I am going to get controversial: do not use your higher power or greater cause as an excuse not to make positive life changes to manage your illness. Really think about what your higher power or greater cause asks of you. One that wants you to be healthy and managing your illness in the best way possible is reasonable. One that asks you to stay stagnant and be unhealthy may not be your higher power, but your own unconsciousness afraid of change.

If you find that after speaking with your higher power, it gives you an answer to stay unhealthy, you may need to seek outside counsel to get to the source of that answer.

Higher Power & Chronic Illness

So how can a greater cause or higher power help you with your chronic illness? That’s something we’ll be examining for September. You may have one, and you may not. Whatever works for you and keeps you motivated and feeling happy – that’s what matters most.

Your wellness journey is your own, and ultimately, you need to stick with what keeps you moving forward healthily.


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Featured photo credit: Canva

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