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MS in the Time of COVID-19

I wanted to write a post about what it’s like to have MS in the time of COVID-19. A pandemic that overwhelmingly affects people with underlying conditions, which MS is. Chronic disease is an underlying condition. Adding in an immunosuppressant DMT can increase the risk of not being able to fight COVID-19. 

Does this mean I have an increased chance of dying from COVID-19 if I get it?

It’s not a simple “yes” or “no.” The answer is mostly, “I don’t know, but I can point to what the experts currently say on the matter.” Then I have to do what is right for me to stay safe. 

MS and COVID-19

First things, first. I am not a healthcare worker. Nor am I in public health. My knowledge in this area is minimal. It starts and stops with the amount of research I am willing to do on the matter. Therefore, take what follows, not as a replacement for medical expert advice.

And that’s what I want to may a point of: do your research on your condition. What you find might bring small comfort. 

When I sat down and researched my risk as someone with MS, who at one point in time was on an immunosuppressant DMT, I was shocked by what I found. For the current medical research out there, I am not at an increased risk of dying from COVID-19 if I got it. If I were older or had a comorbid condition, then I would be at a higher risk of contracting and struggling to fight the illness.

Outside of the MS, I am healthy. I have asthma, which is problematic. Still, my asthma is so well under control that you could make the argument that I don’t have it (diagnosed in childhood).

But if you have MS, your MS alone will not increase your chances of not being able to fight COVID-19. It’s everything surrounding the MS that might cause issues. That is why we, as people with chronic conditions, must be vigilant in how we approach this illness. 

Listen to current guidance from reputable health organizations, like the CDCWHO, or NHS. If you live in the United States, turn off the TV during the daily press briefings. Rarely will you get useful information on how to stay safe at this time, unless it is coming from the NIAID director. It is hard science and facts that will keep us safe and get us through this. Not intuition or feelings.

This is a great resource for what you can do to stay safe while living with MS.

When I was a Statistic

I recognize that not everyone is as lucky as me with their MS or chronic illness. At the very beginning of this crisis hitting the United States, I genuinely believed I was going to die from COVID-19. I swore that my MS would be the cause of it or my DMT.

For a solid month, I believed I was the person the news referred to when they said “underlying conditions” and “immunocompromised.” I was immunocompromised while on Tecfidera. But given the side effects I experienced and the pandemic, I decided to drop the DMT. I will be speaking more to my decision, and to my neurologist, on what my next steps will be in a later post. 

During this time, I was frightened. What I was most afraid of was not the illness itself, but leaving Jai and Ash. Jai would barely have memories of his mother, and I desperately wanted him to at least remember the love I have for him. Three is much too young to lose a parent, and my fear was for him rather than myself.

Believing I was a statistic brought on additional stress and frustration. It escalated my chances of an exacerbation (though I have yet to have one). It made my emotions run all over the place. I felt out of control, and I’ve talked about how problematic that is for me before. Grouping myself into the statistics was toxic for my mental health. 

I had to reign it in for myself and my family. That’s where the research helped me have a realistic picture of my situation. It gave me the necessary tools to feel more in control and how I managed my MS moving forward. I needed to find ways to provide myself comfort.

Finding Comfort

I want to preface this section by saying I am incredibly privileged to be secure in my home, my work, my food, and my family situation. I know not everyone is as lucky as me.

So, where do I find comfort at this time?

For me, it’s staying up-to-date on the latest science. I make sure to get it from vetted, reputable sources, not opinion-based “news” sites. There is only one way to look at the pandemic, and that is through hard science. The beauty of science is that it is always evolving. It is ever-changing when it runs into a dead-end or a faulty hypothesis. It adapts and finds new answers that push everything forward. 

It is through the science that I’ve found that I don’t need to live with the same level of fear I did a month ago. It is where I found my comfort.

But that said, the science is changing so much daily that it is sometimes best to give myself a day or two break from the latest news. Some days I only look at the information in the morning and don’t bother to interact with it for a day or two. 

Instead, I’ve created schedules for myself and the family that I stick by as much as possible. I try to create some version of a routine for us to help with our mental health.

Other things I am doing that provide comfort:

  • I minimalize our interaction with the public as much as possible. I’m getting us down to grocery shopping every other week. 
  • I made masks for the whole family. I wear the mask and gloves each time I have to go shopping (I properly dispose of the gloves, in my garbage at home).
  • I social distance as much as possible on runs or walks.
  • I wash my hands for 20 seconds and avoid touching my face for the day if I’ve been out in public.

The most important activity I do is to remind myself that this is temporary and will not be forever. I view all of this as a passing situation that I have to deal with for the next few months (or years), and will ultimately be a blip in what I hope will be a long life.

Yes, it hurts to be away from friends and running buddies. Yes, it hurts not to be able to go out in public spaces whenever I want. However, I am helping those on the frontlines of this fight by not putting myself in the hospital. 

Ultimately, I do not know which way the wind will blow if I catch COVID-19. I could be asymptomatic, it could be like a bad flu. Or it could be so devastating that I do need to be put on a ventilator. I don’t know how my body will react to it if I get it. Therefore, I take this time not to be angry at the injustice of it all, and it is unjust, but to appreciate what I am getting out of it. I am getting time with my family, time to read, time to explore new hobbies, and time to learn more about myself. 

I am grateful that I can write that last sentence. I know not everyone can.

We are in a difficult time, and living with MS makes it even more challenging. But the current science says that our MS alone will not increase our chances of getting and dying from COVID-19. The comorbid conditions impact that. I hope you find the same small comfort I did when I learned this information.

Remember, continue to follow the appropriate guidelines and keep yourself safe. We are in this together, and together we will get through it.

Attention to Chronic Illness Bloggers!

The MS Mommy Blog is looking to collaborate with other chronic illness bloggers for this year. If you have a chronic illness blog and would like an opportunity to tap into the MS Mommy Blog audience, please contact me here. I look forward to hearing from you.


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What It’s Like: Taking Tecfidera

For January 2020, I committed myself to get back onto MS Disease-Modifying Therapy (DMT) or Disease-Modifying Drugs (DMD). My rationale is that while I am managing my MS well without medication, any DMT provides an insurance policy against disease progression. My healthy living changes were always with the end goal to work as a complement to my DMT. And as a blogger, I wanted to share what it’s like taking Tecfidera as a DMT.

Part of the reason why it was so quiet in January is because I focused on getting onto Tecfidera, managing my self-care, and my regular mother duties.

What follows is a brief introduction to Tecfidera, my experience getting back on it, a comparison to when I first took Tecfidera in December 2014, and my final thoughts on the whole experience.

As per my medical disclaimer, I am not a medical professional, so please take what follows as my personal experience and anecdotal, not scientific fact. If you are on Tecfidera or consider taking Tecfidera, you may find your experience varies from mine. 

The Medication

There is information on the website about Tecfidera, so if you are thinking about taking it for your MS, I recommend going directly to the source for your research. I wanted to highlight information that related to my experience.

Tecfidera is a DMT that is believed to “modulate the immune response to be less inflammatory and […] could be protective against damage to the brain and spinal cord.” It helps keep your body from inflammation, a common problem with MS exacerbations. Biogen isn’t able to pinpoint what about the drug works, just that it helps reduce the occurrence of exacerbations. In a 2-year study, 27% of the people on Tecfidera found their exacerbation cut by 47% (compared to a placebo). 

Note: Biogen only links to two two-year studies.

Some of the known side effects include flushing and stomach pain, usually within the first month of starting the therapy. Flushing can occur anywhere but typically face, chest, and hands. Stomach pain can range from mild discomfort to physical distress. Both of these side effects decrease the longer you take the medication. After a month, the stomach pains typically end, and within several months, the flushing stops. 

Tecfidera is also known to bring on Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), a disease that attacks your brain and leads to death if not treated. The JC Virus causes PML. Most adults carry the dormant JC Virus with no ill effects, but taking Tecfidera is known to reactivate the JC Virus. Unfortunately, three MS medications do this. Fortunately, getting PML is rare.

To combat this, Biogen recommends getting frequent blood tests to check for JC Virus antibodies. If you reach a specific number of antibodies in your blood, then there’s a chance you have PML and should stop your DMT immediately. If your prescribing doctor does not recommend regular blood tests, please ask for them.

There are more side effects, warnings, and suggestions related to Tecfidera, so I recommend you check that out here.

Biogen provides patients with a tapering pack when you begin the therapy. This pack includes fourteen 120-mg pills: take one 120-mg pill twice a day for seven days. It also consists of a container with 240-mg pills, which is the normal dosage: you take one 240-mg pill twice a day for the rest of the month.

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Love & MS

This post was originally published in February 2018. I’ve updated it to include a follow up since the original publication.


We don’t get to choose whether or not we get MS, nor do we get to decide when we get that diagnosis. For some, it comes while in a relationship, and for others, it happens outside of one.

Either scenario forces the following self-reflectiondoes my partner stay with me? And, do I disclose my situation on a date? MS is challenging because it turns partners or potential partners into caretakers.

It fosters self-doubt after the diagnosisis my partner with me because they feel obligated? Do they resent having to care for me? Are they only interested in me because they have to “fix” me? What happens if they leave or die before me?

It is little wonder that many bloggers and experts refer to MS as the third wheel in a relationship. It’s an unwanted obstacle that can put a strain on any current or budding relationship.

The Third Wheel

MS is the unpredictable cousin that comes into your life and needs a place to crash until they get on their feet. They take up space on a centrally located couch and refuse to leave when you want to watch a movie with your partner (or bring a date home). They say they are looking for a job, but really spend all day watching half-hour courtroom shows with ads for injury lawyers.

It’s that cousin that interrupts you every time you want to have a conversation with someone. Because of the interruption, you forget what you were saying and get frustrated because you can’t remember.

Simply put: MS is an unwelcome third-party to your relationship that isn’t going to leave anytime soon. No matter how many times you ask it to get its act together and move on.

Trying to figure MS out and how it factors into a relationship is extremely hard. In addition to maintaining a relationship, I am trying to learn my limitations. How much do I put on or ask of Ash? Should I even ask him to help? Is the relationship lopsided? Am I really that bad that I need his help? Or am I just imagining things?

MS is always hiding in the background of every thought or action I take. I have to plan out my day to make sure I have enough energy for when Ash gets home to make any interactions with him meaningful. I have to pause frequently and ask myself: am I feeling this way because this is normal for someone who only got 4 hours of sleep with a teething toddler, or is this because of the MS?

As you can see, I ask myself a lot of questions. I tend to overthink things, and so it takes a lot of energy to manage my MS. So when it is time for quality time with Ash, sometimes I just don’t have what it takes to be the partner I think he deserves.

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Checking In: MS Symptoms

This post was originally published in February 2018. I’ve updated it to include a follow up since the original publication.


What good is discussing diet and lifestyle changes if I don’t reveal the ongoing results?

Doing an honest self-assessment of any sort is hard, particularly when trying to find ways to manage an unmanageable disease. There’s a huge desire to make everything a “success” or engage in placebo effect-like thinking, but that isn’t always the case.

Overall, I feel like I am managing my MS better. Still, on a day-to-day basis, my mileage may vary because of various external factors.

Current Health Self-Check

Currently, I am not doing so well. Not necessarily because of the MS, but I have a weird seasonal head cold. Drippy nose, sore throat, and exhaustion. I can only assume that if a person without MS gets a virus like this, they may feel wiped out but can go about their daily lives with minimal interference.

With MS and any illness, I get so wiped out that getting out of bed is a hardship. Ash had to stay home until Jai went down for his morning nap on Tuesday because I was so worn out. I needed the extra couple of hours of sleep. This afforded me before I was able to start the day and take care of a toddler. Jai and I stayed in our PJs and read lots of books and minimized movement so I wouldn’t overdo it.

This is a crucial example of why getting sick with MS is “dangerous.” It won’t necessarily cause any physical harm. Still, infections are a significant cause of flare-ups, so there is a risk of needing to get steroids to treat the inflammation. I don’t get avoidant if I know someone is sick. Still, I do recognize that even a simple cold can knock me off my feet for a couple of days that might just inconvenience someone else.

I usually wouldn’t write about getting sick factoring into how I am currently feeling because I tend not to get sick all that often. Still, since having Jai, it has become a more common occurrence. 

Beyond the cold, I am feeling okay overall. There’s been some emotional disappointment in not being able to maintain my diet as strictly as I wanted. I am doing what is best for my overall health, and that is more important. My brain fog and memory issues haven’t lessened, but that may be because I am not doing enough mental exercises to help stimulate neuron repair.

Fatigue is still an issue, but not so much on the days that I am more active. I find high-cardio days mean that I have more energy throughout the day. On the days I only do yoga, there might be a more significant dip in energy by the afternoon.

Being completely honest: I haven’t noticed many changes since my last check-in after my diet reset. I feel more active, happier, less sluggish, but no apparent changes to my MS symptoms.

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Sugar and Chronic Illness

This post was originally published in October 2017. I’ve updated it to include a follow up since the original publication. Find my thoughts on sugar and chronic illness under my update.

2019 Note: This was a check-in post relating to a series of diet changes I made. Because I was breastfeeding Jai, I could not take my MS medication until I finished. I wanted to find a way to manage my illness until I restarted my medication.


Cutting sugar went smoother than I expected, though there were a few days where I was irritable, according to Ash. I refuse to believe him, but deep down, I know he’s right. No longer having that emotional crutch makes for a very grumpy me.

Psychologically speaking, it was a lot easier than I expected. As long as I didn’t have sugary treats in the house (I tossed all of our sweets or sent them with Ash to work); I avoided buying sugary drinks (everyone knows that my weakness is a good Pumpkin Spice Latte in the fall). If I had fruit for any sweet cravings, I was good to go. Every time I drove by a Starbucks, there was a temptation to pull in and just give in to that PSL craving, but I made sure to keep going and have a few bites of pineapple as soon as I got home.

A couple of times, I did eventually stop at Starbucks, and I made sure only to order an Americano. Before I was pregnant, I was in the habit of drinking all my coffee black unless it was a latte. It wasn’t hard for me to get back into drinking with nothing in them. I think it helped a bit too.

Coffee is a wonder drug (and sadly, probably something I need to add to my drop list), and can make a lot of things better.

I didn’t notice any headaches, though, at the beginning of the week, I was more sluggish and in need of an extra nap or two during the day. By the time Ash came home from work, I was very ready to pass Jai off to him, so I could lay down and not think or move for an hour. By day 3 or so, I had a little more energy, and by this morning (day 5), I had even more energy to do my running around without the need for a nap.

I also noticed that during my long run on Thursday, I was able to keep up with my mom and felt less fatigued at the end of it. I also felt motivated to go again this morning (though that would be off schedule). Me? Motivated to run off schedule? This really is unheard of – I hate running.

While shopping, I made sure to review all the labels like I said I would: any time it was High Fructose Corn Syrup or unidentified form of “sugar,” I would move along. From my research, they said that sugar is hidden in everything, and it really is true. Sugar is everywhere. Foods that I usually love to eat, like certain types of crackers or even grab-n-go frozen meals…all contain sugar. I also made sure to avoid agave and honey. If the item were sweetened with fruit juice or dates – I would be willing to grab it to consume.

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