ms-covid-19

MS in the Time of COVID-19

I wanted to write a post about what it’s like to have MS in the time of COVID-19. A pandemic that overwhelmingly affects people with underlying conditions, which MS is. Chronic disease is an underlying condition. Adding in an immunosuppressant DMT can increase the risk of not being able to fight COVID-19. 

Does this mean I have an increased chance of dying from COVID-19 if I get it?

It’s not a simple “yes” or “no.” The answer is mostly, “I don’t know, but I can point to what the experts currently say on the matter.” Then I have to do what is right for me to stay safe. 

MS and COVID-19

First things, first. I am not a healthcare worker. Nor am I in public health. My knowledge in this area is minimal. It starts and stops with the amount of research I am willing to do on the matter. Therefore, take what follows, not as a replacement for medical expert advice.

And that’s what I want to may a point of: do your research on your condition. What you find might bring small comfort. 

When I sat down and researched my risk as someone with MS, who at one point in time was on an immunosuppressant DMT, I was shocked by what I found. For the current medical research out there, I am not at an increased risk of dying from COVID-19 if I got it. If I were older or had a comorbid condition, then I would be at a higher risk of contracting and struggling to fight the illness.

Outside of the MS, I am healthy. I have asthma, which is problematic. Still, my asthma is so well under control that you could make the argument that I don’t have it (diagnosed in childhood).

But if you have MS, your MS alone will not increase your chances of not being able to fight COVID-19. It’s everything surrounding the MS that might cause issues. That is why we, as people with chronic conditions, must be vigilant in how we approach this illness. 

Listen to current guidance from reputable health organizations, like the CDCWHO, or NHS. If you live in the United States, turn off the TV during the daily press briefings. Rarely will you get useful information on how to stay safe at this time, unless it is coming from the NIAID director. It is hard science and facts that will keep us safe and get us through this. Not intuition or feelings.

This is a great resource for what you can do to stay safe while living with MS.

When I was a Statistic

I recognize that not everyone is as lucky as me with their MS or chronic illness. At the very beginning of this crisis hitting the United States, I genuinely believed I was going to die from COVID-19. I swore that my MS would be the cause of it or my DMT.

For a solid month, I believed I was the person the news referred to when they said “underlying conditions” and “immunocompromised.” I was immunocompromised while on Tecfidera. But given the side effects I experienced and the pandemic, I decided to drop the DMT. I will be speaking more to my decision, and to my neurologist, on what my next steps will be in a later post. 

During this time, I was frightened. What I was most afraid of was not the illness itself, but leaving Jai and Ash. Jai would barely have memories of his mother, and I desperately wanted him to at least remember the love I have for him. Three is much too young to lose a parent, and my fear was for him rather than myself.

Believing I was a statistic brought on additional stress and frustration. It escalated my chances of an exacerbation (though I have yet to have one). It made my emotions run all over the place. I felt out of control, and I’ve talked about how problematic that is for me before. Grouping myself into the statistics was toxic for my mental health. 

I had to reign it in for myself and my family. That’s where the research helped me have a realistic picture of my situation. It gave me the necessary tools to feel more in control and how I managed my MS moving forward. I needed to find ways to provide myself comfort.

Finding Comfort

I want to preface this section by saying I am incredibly privileged to be secure in my home, my work, my food, and my family situation. I know not everyone is as lucky as me.

So, where do I find comfort at this time?

For me, it’s staying up-to-date on the latest science. I make sure to get it from vetted, reputable sources, not opinion-based “news” sites. There is only one way to look at the pandemic, and that is through hard science. The beauty of science is that it is always evolving. It is ever-changing when it runs into a dead-end or a faulty hypothesis. It adapts and finds new answers that push everything forward. 

It is through the science that I’ve found that I don’t need to live with the same level of fear I did a month ago. It is where I found my comfort.

But that said, the science is changing so much daily that it is sometimes best to give myself a day or two break from the latest news. Some days I only look at the information in the morning and don’t bother to interact with it for a day or two. 

Instead, I’ve created schedules for myself and the family that I stick by as much as possible. I try to create some version of a routine for us to help with our mental health.

Other things I am doing that provide comfort:

  • I minimalize our interaction with the public as much as possible. I’m getting us down to grocery shopping every other week. 
  • I made masks for the whole family. I wear the mask and gloves each time I have to go shopping (I properly dispose of the gloves, in my garbage at home).
  • I social distance as much as possible on runs or walks.
  • I wash my hands for 20 seconds and avoid touching my face for the day if I’ve been out in public.

The most important activity I do is to remind myself that this is temporary and will not be forever. I view all of this as a passing situation that I have to deal with for the next few months (or years), and will ultimately be a blip in what I hope will be a long life.

Yes, it hurts to be away from friends and running buddies. Yes, it hurts not to be able to go out in public spaces whenever I want. However, I am helping those on the frontlines of this fight by not putting myself in the hospital. 

Ultimately, I do not know which way the wind will blow if I catch COVID-19. I could be asymptomatic, it could be like a bad flu. Or it could be so devastating that I do need to be put on a ventilator. I don’t know how my body will react to it if I get it. Therefore, I take this time not to be angry at the injustice of it all, and it is unjust, but to appreciate what I am getting out of it. I am getting time with my family, time to read, time to explore new hobbies, and time to learn more about myself. 

I am grateful that I can write that last sentence. I know not everyone can.

We are in a difficult time, and living with MS makes it even more challenging. But the current science says that our MS alone will not increase our chances of getting and dying from COVID-19. The comorbid conditions impact that. I hope you find the same small comfort I did when I learned this information.

Remember, continue to follow the appropriate guidelines and keep yourself safe. We are in this together, and together we will get through it.

Attention to Chronic Illness Bloggers!

The MS Mommy Blog is looking to collaborate with other chronic illness bloggers for this year. If you have a chronic illness blog and would like an opportunity to tap into the MS Mommy Blog audience, please contact me here. I look forward to hearing from you.


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Checking In: MS Symptoms

This post was originally published in February 2018. I’ve updated it to include a follow up since the original publication.


What good is discussing diet and lifestyle changes if I don’t reveal the ongoing results?

Doing an honest self-assessment of any sort is hard, particularly when trying to find ways to manage an unmanageable disease. There’s a huge desire to make everything a “success” or engage in placebo effect-like thinking, but that isn’t always the case.

Overall, I feel like I am managing my MS better. Still, on a day-to-day basis, my mileage may vary because of various external factors.

Current Health Self-Check

Currently, I am not doing so well. Not necessarily because of the MS, but I have a weird seasonal head cold. Drippy nose, sore throat, and exhaustion. I can only assume that if a person without MS gets a virus like this, they may feel wiped out but can go about their daily lives with minimal interference.

With MS and any illness, I get so wiped out that getting out of bed is a hardship. Ash had to stay home until Jai went down for his morning nap on Tuesday because I was so worn out. I needed the extra couple of hours of sleep. This afforded me before I was able to start the day and take care of a toddler. Jai and I stayed in our PJs and read lots of books and minimized movement so I wouldn’t overdo it.

This is a crucial example of why getting sick with MS is “dangerous.” It won’t necessarily cause any physical harm. Still, infections are a significant cause of flare-ups, so there is a risk of needing to get steroids to treat the inflammation. I don’t get avoidant if I know someone is sick. Still, I do recognize that even a simple cold can knock me off my feet for a couple of days that might just inconvenience someone else.

I usually wouldn’t write about getting sick factoring into how I am currently feeling because I tend not to get sick all that often. Still, since having Jai, it has become a more common occurrence. 

Beyond the cold, I am feeling okay overall. There’s been some emotional disappointment in not being able to maintain my diet as strictly as I wanted. I am doing what is best for my overall health, and that is more important. My brain fog and memory issues haven’t lessened, but that may be because I am not doing enough mental exercises to help stimulate neuron repair.

Fatigue is still an issue, but not so much on the days that I am more active. I find high-cardio days mean that I have more energy throughout the day. On the days I only do yoga, there might be a more significant dip in energy by the afternoon.

Being completely honest: I haven’t noticed many changes since my last check-in after my diet reset. I feel more active, happier, less sluggish, but no apparent changes to my MS symptoms.

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Parenting with a Disability

This post was originally published in February 2018. I’ve updated it to include a follow up since the original publication.


This is the final week in a 3-week series on parenting observations. Week one is based on gentle parentingweek two is about parenting with compassion, and week three is about parenting with a disability.

These posts are based on my personal experiences as a parent and are not meant in any way to judge other parenting styles or decisions. I am offering my own research and conclusions as possible suggestions for others out there; therefore, these posts will be as objective as possible. When it comes to parenting: if the method isn’t abusive, there really isn’t a wrong way to parent your child. Be secure and do what works best for you and your family and ignore outside judgment.


For many people, parenthood is fraught with challenges: getting enough sleep, the terrible twos, and the need for independence as children grow older. For a select few, there is the added challenge of balancing parenting and a disability of some sort.

Parenting without a disability is difficult, and parenting with one presents its own unique challenges. With some adaptations, parenting with a disability is no harder than parenting without one. Remember: it’s comparing apples and oranges; each type is challenging and straightforward in their own ways.

The key is to know what the limits are, having a support system of some sort to help manage those limitations, and keeping everything in a proper perspective.

In the final week of my parenting series, this week will be based more on observations from my own experience coupled with resources found online. If you are a parent with a disability, you may see some similarities in your situation. Hopefully, this will provide some validation to your experience.

Nota bene: This post will be using the universal “you/second person” pronouns throughout, so it may not speak to your experience directly.

Visible versus Invisible

There are two different types of disabilities out there: the ones you can see and the ones you cannot. For people with invisible disabilities, this can lead to a lot of issues, mainly if a person looks “normal” but uses a handicap parking space. A person does not need to be in a wheelchair, despite the universal logo, to be disabled.

Multiple Sclerosis can be both: for those with PPMS and SPMS (and at times, RRMS), it’s a more visible disability. The person can use a cane, walker, or scooter. It can be abnormal speech patterns, cognitive difficulties, or physical weakness. The outside observer can see the disability.

But many with RRMS don’t display outward symptoms of their diagnosis. Yet, the disability can still be there: fatigue, mental fog, or pain. Flare-ups can cause limb weakness or numbness, which several limits mobility for a short time.

When it is hard to see the disability, it is hard for outsiders to understand the extent of the disability. This can lead to feelings of frustration, inadequacy, and self-doubt by the person with the diagnosis.

Parenting with an invisible disability adds an additional layer of complications: sometimes, it’s hard to make playdate plans because you don’t know how you might feel that day. You may not remember simple details about your child’s life, and therefore seem disengaged with the parenting process from the outside. None of these reasons make you less of a parent, it just alters how you parent.

Ultimately, for those with an invisible disability, they can spend part of their day mentally preparing for outside judgment because people might not know or understand the situation. Outside judgment isn’t a daily occurrence, but when it happens, it stings because you are left feeling inadequate.

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Stress and MS



Stress and MS.

These two go hand-in-hand. Without one, you wouldn’t get the other. Stress is a universal problem, something everyone deals with at some point in their life. Sometimes it is good, it motivates us to push through a problem for a solution. Other times it can hinder us and negatively impact our health.

I’ve talked about stress multiple times on the blog, but I knew that for MS Awareness month it deserved its own post. Stress plays such a big role in coping with MS, that for some of us, it induce our initial symptoms.

What is Stress?

Experts talk about stress on the morning talk shows. We complain to friends about it. Universally, we know and understand stress. But physiologically, what is stress and how does it affect someone who isn’t suffering from MS?

Stress is the body’s response to changes in mental, emotional, or physical changes. While the body is designed to handle stress, too much can trigger a negative physical reaction. If enduring a period of long and extreme stress, you are more likely to get sick. Your body starts to work against itself: ulcers, headaches, depression, anxiety/panic attacks to name some conditions induced by stress.

But it’s not always a bad thing.

Stress as a Positive

I firmly believe in good and bad stress. I thrive on positive stress: working on an important personal project and working up to the deadline to complete it.

Stress is one of the main drivers to get me to write as much as I do for the blog. It keeps me on track and keeps me posting.

I find that it’s such a major motivator in my life: I am freaking out to complete something, but I feel so productive once it’s accomplished. Turns out that “good” stress is a thing: it’s also known as eustress. Eustress we know we can handle and it’s usually short-term. It’s not necessarily easy to handle, but it’s manageable and can be used to drive us forward.

It’s what helps make an effort towards self-improvement.

Stress as a Negative

When we think about stress, it’s usually negative. It’s what causes us to freeze and feel burnt out. It’s hard to work through and can leave us feeling tense and angry.

This sort of stress is the kind that shortens your lifespan. It’s the kind that you have very little control over. When life throws hurdle after hurdle at you, and there’s no way to get out from underneath it, it’s this form of “distress” we experience.

This distress is where morning shows stake their segments upon. We buy books, browse blogs, pin ideas, and take classes all trying to cope with the distress we experience. We want to get rid of it because of how uncomfortable and miserable it makes us feel.

Unfortunately, we have very little control over when it ends and what it does in our lives.

Stress and MS

I spoke with my neurologist a year or so into my diagnosis and mentioned a potentially stressful situation. I asked him about how this situation would impact my health and my MS.

“Negatively,” was his response, “ask [those involved] to knock it off and do you want a prescription to give them?”

We had a good laugh over the absurdity of doing such a thing, but it got me to thinking. I was still in the middle of a stressful situation with graduate school and I wondered if it was contributing to some of the “secondary” MS symptoms I experienced: memory fog and fatigue.

I was not wrong: stress does lead to flare-ups. Curious enough, having MS (or any chronic illness) can cause stress too. It turns into a vicious cycle: you worry about the disease, the disease acts up, which stresses you out even more.

Exacerbations Induced by Stress

This study, published in 2004, looked at all the studies associated with MS, stress, and exacerbations over the period of thirty-eight years. They found a connection between stress that increases the chances of exacerbations with those diagnosed with MS.

If you have MS and found that your exacerbations or just your normal symptoms get worse when coping with a stressful situation, you aren’t imagining it. I personally found relief in knowing that managing my stress was a way to lower my chances of getting an exacerbation.

I understand that I am in a unique position to be able to manage my disease to lower my chances of an exacerbation. Not all people with MS are able to do so, if at all. There are days where stress gets close to causing an exacerbation, but I am able to recognize what is happening to help slow everything down to avoid it.

The Emotional Toll

Anecdotally, I can say for certain that extremely stressful situations, particularly relating to my personal life, increases my chances of getting an exacerbation. I was shocked at how quickly a flare-up appeared when I was in the middle of an extremely stressful moment and my arm started to go numb. Normally, I wake up with the exacerbation. It doesn’t literally happen before my eyes.

Thankfully, when I resolved the situation, the numbness went away within a day.

What’s most annoying about stress is that I have to plan my life around it. I have to take it into consideration when making major decisions. Will this freak me out? Will this bring on an exacerbation?

As I mentioned in my posts about toxic relationships, I’ve had to learn to be okay with cutting toxic people out of my life because of the problems the relationship induces. It’s discouraging when I have to manage relationships for my MS because there’s always this fear of lacking compassion on my part.

I’ve had to learn how to deal with feeling selfish which is always an uncomfortable place to be in.

Managing my stress is emotionally draining and stressful in itself. Later this week, I will discuss how exactly I manage it. Hint: self-compassion is involved along with learning to no longer care.


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Featured photo credit: Leah Kelley from Pexels


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MS Symptoms: Optic Neuritis

The very first MS symptom I experienced was Optic Neuritis. I woke up one morning in a hotel room unable to see out of my left eye after a stressful experience. I’ve talked about this particular symptom throughout the blog because it played such a significant role in getting my MS diagnosis.

From the time I’ve spent in online MS support groups, I’ve found that the majority of other people with MS received their diagnosis after experiencing the optic neuritis exacerbation. I imagine it is the shock value: waking up and suddenly having a blob in your field of vision? You have to pay attention to what is going on because it is literally in your face.

What is Optic Neuritis?

Simply put: it’s an inflammation of the optic nerve which causes a temporary loss of vision. It can be painful and is primarily linked with Multiple Sclerosis and a few other autoimmune diseases such as Lupus.

Symptoms of optic neuritis include:

  • Pain
  • Loss of vision in one eye
  • Reduced field of vision
  • Loss of color (colors are muted or vision is grayscale)
  • Flashing lights

Optic neuritis is primarily treated through steroids to help reduce the inflammation.

I cannot diagnose anyone online, but I can offer a suggestion to bring to your healthcare professional for discussion:

If you are experiencing loss of vision in one or both eyes and your otomotrist, primary care provider, or opthalmologist are unable to figure out what is going on, consider asking them to test for optic neuritis. I wish someone had told me to consider this option early on as it would have reduced months of confusing and frustrating tests and gotten me the necessary treatment sooner.

Canary in the Coalmine

While the L’Hermitte’s Sign is one of the first indications that I am really stressed out, waking up to an optic neuritis blotch in my field of vision means I have an exacerbation requiring medical intervention. Sometimes I get numbness in my limbs, but I know that I am in trouble when I cannot see or am losing vision in one of my eyes.

Prior to my diagnosis, I was completely unaware as to what was causing my optic neuritis flare-ups. I thought migraine auras, as I had migraines previously but no auras. I would eventually get a migraine and the optic neuritis would fade away, but I can imagine it was a coincidence.

Now, if I get the slightest blotch in my eyes, I immediately contact my neurologist so we can come up with a treatment plan. Sometimes we wait and see if it gets worse and other times I get on some steroids to help reduce the inflammation. Regardless, I know I need to figure out what is stressing me out to cause the initial inflammation episode.

Invisible Symptom = Lying?

Many people with MS have that story.

That story of: “but are you really sick or are you just lying for attention?” My optic neuritis gave me my first and hopefully the only story of ableist treatment by others.

It was prior to my diagnosis and I volunteered in graduate school over the summer. This position required my sight. No amount of accommodations would work: I needed to be able to read to perform my duties as a volunteer.

I tactfully told the people running the program that I could not volunteer and teach at the same time due to some health concerns. I couldn’t stop teaching, so I figured all unpaid work could wait until I was feeling better or at the start of the fall semester.

Because it was summer and I made plans prior to my flare-ups, I went to a concert with a friend and posted about it on social media.

I didn’t realize this caused a stir with those I volunteered for until someone unaffiliated reached out to me. I remember the conversation divulging how people said I lied about my health to get out of volunteering my time.

I was flabbergasted at so many people: at the person bringing this information to me; those in charge; and everyone unaffiliated with situation talking about how I was faking my health issues. My health issues were none of their business and they did not know how I got to the concert. I told the person who started the conversation that concerts do not require sight and I deserved a bit of a break from my health issues if only for a night.

This accusation of shirking my duties made me feel insecure about my health that I felt obligated to overshare with the program once I got my diagnosis. Up until recently, I would explain my issues with MS as a reason for not doing something.

I am at a point where I realize that I do not owe an explanation for myself or my health.

The Emotional Impact

Warning: talk of self harm ahead. If you or someone you know self-harms, please know you are not alone.


Now that I know how to treat this exacerbation, I typically go with the flow and it’s more of an inconvenience than anything. I am bothered when it happens, sure, but that has more to do with feeling frustrated that its happening in the first place.

But when I didn’t know what was going on, this symptom caused the greatest emotional breakdown I had prior to my diagnosis. I needed to see for school and work, I could do neither. I was terrified because the doctors were not providing me with any information or hope of getting better.

Each day, I would wake up hoping I could see out of my left eye again. Each day I woke up unable to see I grew more and more anxious and frustrationed with my body.

I remember taking a shower one day, in the middle of my worst optic neuritis exacerbation (I couldn’t see out of both eyes), completely frustrated over no answers to what was happening to me. I started bashing my head against the side of the shower wall because I was so angry at my body that I wanted to knock the sight back into my eyes.

Fortunately, Ash was there and heard the banging that he immediately jumped into the shower to stop me from causing any serious damage. I was lucky to not concuss myself or cause any lacerations. I just remember him holding me down to stop me from harming myself further and comforting me as I cried for myself.

It was one of my darkest emotional moments.

Even thinking about it puts me back into that mindset of abject hopelessness. That complete lack of control and confusion is indescribable. I hope never to be in that place again.

Once I was in the hospital after my MRI, I felt so much relief in finally getting treatment. An answer was secondary at that point, but I was glad to be on the road to receiving one. If you are interested in reading how I’ve learned to manage this symptom and my cognitive fog from Monday’s post, please sign up for my newsletter. I will be discussing both symptoms in Friday’s newsletter.


Featured Photo Credit: Amanda Dalbjörn on Unsplash