Information Huddle

MS Fundraising Opportunities

Fundraising is important to the longevity of a cause; it raises awareness, helps fund research, provides opportunities for those without financial means, and helps bring in volunteers who want to do more.

Fundraising for a particular group, like the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, helps create and sustain programs for those with MS and their caretakers, fund research opportunities, and hopefully fund a cure. Below are some ways to find a fundraiser right for you or creating one that fits.

Finding a Fundraiser

If you want to get involved in a current fundraiser – I have compiled some reputable sources that have ongoing events.

Creating a Fundraiser

If there isn’t a fundraiser in your area here are some tips for getting one started. For those outside the United States, you should be able to find a local MS group that will accept donations.

Other Ways to Raise Money

If you are like me, I love to shop with Amazon for pretty much anything. Several years ago, Amazon started a program where a portion of qualified purchases will go to the charity/non-profit of your choice. The cool thing is this is a portion of the purchase, meaning Amazon doesn’t raise the price of the item so it is at no additional cost to you to participate. If you already shop at Amazon it’s a great way to donate to the NMSS.

We selected the NMSS for our charity of choice and to date, the NMSS has earned nearly $143,000 for qualified purchases through the program by all who participate.

To learn more: Amazon Smile! program.

Facebook has been pushing “raise money for your birthday” feature, but at this point in time, there aren’t any national MS organizations available. I have looked into ways to change that, but Facebook does not make it easy to find any useful information. I will update this post in case anything changes.

What MS fundraisers have you participated in or recommend? Please leave a comment below with your experiences.

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Passing Compassion Along

This is the second week in a 3-week series on parenting observations. Week one is based on gentle parenting, week two is about parenting with compassion, and week three is about parenting with a disability.

These posts are based on my personal experiences as a parent and are not meant in any way to judge other parenting styles or decisions. I am offering my personal research and conclusions as possible suggestions for others out there, therefore these posts will be as objective as possible. When it comes to parenting: provided the method isn’t abusive, there really isn’t a wrong way to parent your child. Be secure and do what works best for you and your family and ignore outside judgement.

Incorporating compassion towards yourself and your little one will naturally lead to raising a compassionate child, but there are other ways to work compassion into the daily routine. There are a lot of great suggestions out there from various parenting websites. I’ve pulled a list together of my favorite suggestions that I want to incorporate with Jai as he grows up and as reminders of what I can do on a daily basis for myself.

Nota bene: This post will be using the universal “you/second person” pronouns throughout, so while it may not speak to your experience directly, it may apply to someone else you know.

Compassion is Nurture not Nature

For some children, compassion appears to be inherent, but for most of us it is something that needs to be taught either by adult example or via life lessons. To best ensure a child becomes a compassionate adult, it is important to teach compassion as part of the growing process. Age of the child (or adult) does not matter, it is something that can be trained at any point in life.

Compassion is not fundamental to being human, but the greater compassion (and self-compassion) a person has, the greater their personal success both personally and professionally.  More than self-esteem, teaching compassion will increase a child’s ability to successfully navigate the world. Increased self-esteem is secondary to compassion in most cases, though it follows closely behind.

Therefore, teaching compassion will be helpful in making the world a better place on a macro-level, but on the individual level for your loved one. The world becomes less harsh, not because of rose-colored glasses, but because your little one does not take adversity personally and takes it in stride. When bad things happen, they are viewed as lessons for growth and not personal insults to their being.

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Lifestyle & Blogging

The Science of Generosity

During the holiday season in the Western world, there is a mindset that people are to be generous with their time and money towards those who are less fortunate. A Christmas Carol is treated like a cautionary tale of what can happen if people pinch their pennies too much.

And to an extent, that is the case: in 2016, there was an upward trend in charitable gift giving with an estimation of $390 billion going to charitable causes, though this statistic isn’t isolated to a specific time of year. There are a number of reasons why people donate to charities at the end of the year: because it feels good, tax write-off, a cause of personal importance, appeal from a charity, etc. Though this survey points that none of these reasons were actually motivating factors and asks the readers why that might be the case.

We can only speculate what truly motivates people to give at the end of the year with this information, but my hope is because there is a feeling of generosity that permeates people during the holiday season. And there’s plenty of reasons why this might be the case.

Continue reading “The Science of Generosity”