cant-ask-for-help

But I Can’t Ask for Help

Have you found yourself in the position where you need help, want to ask for help, but found you are unable to ask? You may even say to yourself, “I want to ask for help, but I just can’t.”

Something stops you from asking. You may know why, and you may not. Often, I am too afraid to ask because I don’t want to take advantage. Other times, I inexplicably cannot bring myself to ask. There’s just a mental block that prevents me from turning to a friend or loved one and saying, “I need help.” They have to drag it out of me.

I am telling you if you are unable to ask for help, you are not alone.

Chronic Illness: The Ultimate Roadblock

Depending on your chronic illness, you may physically be incapable of asking for help. People with Multiple Sclerosis can sometimes have a lesion that affects a part of the brain responsible for managing your mood. One of the earliest symptoms of MS for Karine Mather was anxiety and depression.

Both of these mental health concerns are linked to MS, and both can cause a person to struggle to ask for help when they need it most

MS, and maybe your chronic illness, can create a situation where you logically know you need to ask for help, but you can’t bring yourself to do it. It’s scary when this happens. It’s also incredibly frustrating.

So how do you manage to ask for help when your illness creates the ultimate roadblock?

Finding a Workaround

Sometimes what stops us from requesting help is the physical act of asking. I feel so emotional when I use my voice because often, my voice and emotions will betray my level of need. While I am not required to “be strong,” for anyone, sometimes it opens up a more in-depth discussion. Most of the time, I am not prepared to have this conversation. I need help accomplishing a task, and I don’t want to examine all the emotional baggage I am feeling behind needing to accomplish the task.

So, the best workaround I’ve come up with to date is using technology.

While texting is evolving to include emotion (emojis, memes, and case changes), it is still a relatively emotionless medium. Take advantage of it. Texting or emailing someone allows you to remove all emotion from asking for help and will enable you to ask exactly how you want.

Consider reframing your requests, so it isn’t asking for help. Recently, I was tasked with developing volunteer roles. I needed to write up role requirements, and afraid of looking foolish, I wasn’t sure how to ask for help in starting the process. Rather than directly requesting support, I asked for an example role write-up so I could understand the parameters. It allowed me to ask for help without actually asking.

Reframing is an excellent tool because it allows you to get your request out in the open without compromising your beliefs.

Public Resources

If you are too afraid to ask people around you or have a limited support system, consider looking to public resources. Each “official” website related to a specific chronic illness has an extensive repository of information about the disease, how to manage it, and where to seek help. For example: the National MS Society has a huge section dedicated to resources and support.

You may also have government options available by way of social programs. But if you are like me, you may not be “bad” enough to receive any of these public benefits. Note: I am okay with that for myself. 

If you don’t qualify for a public program, there might be a private program available to get you the help you need. Plenty of people touched by your chronic illness donate to private organizations that can provide the resources you might need at the moment.

Additionally, these sites can have trained volunteers who can chat online or over the phone with any questions you might have. While they cannot answer specific medical questions, they can provide you with resources and a direction to head in with your research. If you get stuck on something, asking a faceless stranger over the internet can be more comfortable.

Look to your healthcare team. If the team isn’t able to, or unwilling to, ask for a referral to another professional. You want someone willing to answer your questions, no matter how illogical or random they may be. The advantage of modern technology is that you can speak to someone online. So if you are in a remote area, or have limited options for specialists, consider finding one online if your insurance will allow it. Note: this is not an endorsement of Live Health Online, I am linking them purely as an example.

Make it Gig

We live in the era of the gig economy, so if you can afford it, consider using it to your advantage. You have sites and apps that can bring you stylists, handypeople, groceries, and take you where you need to go. You don’t have to put friends and family out if you are willing to pay the fee. 

Unfortunately, this means it will add up, but it allows you to “ask” for help. For some of us, it is easier to pay someone than feel like putting a friend out.

Don’t Go it Alone

Having a chronic illness is isolating. Being afraid to ask for help when you need it can further isolate you, but you don’t have to be alone. There are plenty of people in a similar position to you. Look to online support groups to see how others handle their disease.

While chronic illness affects everyone differently, we can find similar symptoms and experiences out there. People who have gone through it found what works, and shared their findings online. It’s what I try to do. Just know that your mileage may vary. You have a better starting point rather than reinventing the wheel.

Find a healthy online space where people strive to uplift each other, rather than remain in a negative mindset regarding the disease. Venting has a place for your mental health, but wallowing does not. Post your story when you are comfortable. Read and engage with the responses given. Plenty of people want to help you, even if they’ve never met you.

If you can’t directly ask for help, find all the passive ways in which you can ask. There are so many opportunities available to you with the advent of technology. You don’t have to be alone in your illness, even if it tries to isolate you.


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Who is to Blame?

After getting a chronic illness diagnosis, there is a flood of emotions and thoughts for the first couple of weeks. One significant feeling is strange relief in finally having an answer depending on the length of your search. But what follows behind is the dark cloud of, “why me?” It’s tempting to blame your higher power for your illness.

To a certain extent, externalizing the blame can be healthy because often it isn’t our fault we got sick. The source of many autoimmune diseases is nebulous or entirely out of our control.

When you blame your higher power, you run the risk of negatively impacting your faith or misplacing it all together. If your higher power is a stable source of comfort and you feel betrayed by them, then the internal conflict that arises can be destabilizing.

The Chronic Illness Crisis

Chronic illness creates a rift in so many different parts of your life. It can negatively impact your intimate, professional, or higher power relationships. There is an existential crisis that occurs when you get your diagnosis. So many overwhelming emotions and very little room to navigate through them. 

When you get into a place where the dust settles, you may be left wondering, especially if you have a belief system, why it is happening to you. How did this happen? Why did this happen? What did I do to deserve this illness?

If you speak with your higher power and hear silence, it can feel particularly frustrating. Often, we are taught to believe that they will be there for us, comfort us, and protect us. Or if you are taught that these sorts of things happen for a reason, it is natural to want to blame the higher power. Rarely do we find a good enough reason to be given a chronic illness.

More concerning, we may even feel to blame for the illness. That we get it because we aren’t following a particular path our higher power laid out for us. Even worse is if an outsider tells us that’s the case.

So did your higher power turn their back on you? And who is actually to blame?

Happenstance or Punishment?

Is your illness a coincidence, or was it some test/punishment put before you?

That’s a question only you can find the answer. I want to tell you that it is not a punishment, that your higher power had nothing to do with giving it to you or allowing it to happen, but that isn’t my place.

If it helps to view illness as a test, and that creates a healthy challenge for you to work towards overcoming, then do it. But if it brings you into a dark emotional place and causes a conflict with your higher power, look towards your options. Your higher power wants you to be healthy and find comfort in them. See what you can do to get back into that space.

When you blame your higher power, you place yourself in the role of victim, and that creates a negative emotional cycle that can spiral out of control. You are a victim of the illness, yes. But you don’t have to give in to the mentality which can lead you to feel stuck.

Who is Responsible for my Illness

Depending on your type of illness, no one.

I have plenty of spots in my life where I can say I am partially to blame for getting my MS. I didn’t get enough vitamin D growing up in New England. I got mononucleosis as a child. But what if I drank a cow’s worth of milk a day, never got mono and still got MS?

It’s pointless to blame myself because I genuinely have no clue why I got MS. I view it as the luck of the draw. If I spend time reflecting on the “shoulda done this,” I would drive myself crazy. I accepted I am not responsible for my illness.

I was deconverting around the time of my diagnosis, but I know precisely my response if I was still religious. It would be a back and forth between blaming my higher power for allowing it to happen and blaming myself for doing something that displeased my higher power. I wouldn’t consider the diagnosis as something that happens in life. I already had a lot of emotional pain with my higher power. I would have either gone to an even darker place emotionally or begun the process of deconverting to protect my mental health.

Yet, my higher power was not to blame for my diagnosis. When I was younger, I often thought of my higher power like a child that flicked bugs for their pleasure. I was a bug, and so they put negative lessons in my path to make me miserable. It wasn’t until I could look back and see what was really happening: I was experiencing the same sort of stuff everyone else did. I was not being singled out as I thought.

Maintain Your Source of Comfort

You need as many sources of comfort in your corner with a chronic illness. If you feel that you must blame your higher power for your chronic disease, consider finding a leader within your community to help you through the healing process. Make sure it is someone you trust, and remember they are fallible too. Their interpretations may not be healthy either, so you may need to search around for someone who provides you the comfort and answers you need.

Blaming your higher power will cause a rift in your relationship. If a relationship brings you comfort, then you want to maintain that connection. It will give you the emotional and mental strength you need for your flare-ups and treatments. Do what you need to do to repair that relationship so you can focus on your health.

If it helps, consider placing the blame where it belongs: circumstance. It’s a random confluence of events that led to your health getting to this point, not you or anything else. While it is a rather abstract thought, and sometimes that does not bring the same level of catharsis, it is healthier than blaming yourself or your higher power.


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surrendering-control

Surrendering Control

As a child, I heard about the importance of surrendering control, especially how it pertained to a higher power. While I spoke a bit on Monday about the importance of giving up control, this post is for those of us who cannot stand the idea of giving up control. When I heard the words “surrender control” growing up, I found that I would internally shudder at the thought. The word “surrender” in this particular context still irritates me years later.

I still haven’t quite identified why I hated the thought of surrendering control, even as a child. I suspect it has something to do with the abject vulnerability that comes from giving up control. I saw that the moments I was most vulnerable, I was also treated as though I was weak. So any display of vulnerability was a display of weakness. Surrendering was the ultimate sign of weakness.

Additionally, growing up, you are beginning to assert your independence. Being told to give up control, just as you are starting to come into control of your own life, feels like so many steps backward. I learned to associate giving up control as infantilizing. I could not differentiate between the “positive” forms of giving up control like going with the flow, and the “negative,” which was micromanaging all aspects of my life.

And so I became a control freak.

How to Give Up Control when You Can’t

It’s all well and good to be told to give up control. It’s one of those “easier said than done” situations.

But when it comes time actually to try and give up control, it can be difficult. I think for those of us who need to be in control are keenly aware of how out of control the world is, so we cling to whatever means to maintain a sense of order. We find areas in our lives we can manage, and even if we manage it poorly, there is some stability in the belief we are in control. 

Humans are masters of deception. Especially self-deception.

So, how do you surrender control?

Not easily, and I wish I were joking about that. This would be one of those areas where, if we could snap our fingers and fix everything, we would do it. I thought if I reflected on it hard enough, it would happen.

But it doesn’t work that way. Giving up control isn’t just a thought-based exercise. It requires active participation. I was seeking for something else to take control from me, even though it wasn’t for it to take, nor was I willing actually to give it. I couldn’t expect anyone, or thing, to take control. 

I, and I alone, could give up the control in my life. But I am like an addict, and to be sure, control is addictive, and addicts struggle to give up their drug of choice. While micromanaging my life brought on only stress, frustration, and health problems, I was unwilling to give up my “drug.”

Once I realized that I was responsible for my own burden, that the only way I would regain control in my life is to let it go, was I able to make a choice needed in the situation.

Now, if you have a higher power, you might say this: my teachings tell me to give up control. Many allegories teach to give to your higher power. Yes, but make sure you are actively giving up control and not expecting your higher power to take control from you. This is the trap I fell into. Make them your focal point, but remember that only you can say “I am going to give up control in this area of my life.”

Often, meditating or praying to that higher power or the universe can give you the strength you need to do so, so keep that in mind as well.

But it really has to be your decision to let go. Acknowledge that you are not in complete control of your life, that you are going to go with the flow, and accept whatever life hands you as graciously as possible.

Clear Head; Healthy Decisions

Control freaks: do you find that your head gets so cluttered with all that you have to do? All that you have to remember? All that you didn’t do, and now you feel frustrated?

The advantage of surrendering control is that it gives you a clearer head. No longer do you have to think about all the parts of your life you need to manage. You get a chance to prioritize what you can control and what you can’t. It allows you to reflect on your life more objectively.

Remember when I talked about not having expectations and accepting everything? No longer do you place expectations on your higher power or life to take control from you (you’ve given it over freely), and therefore, you can accept anything that comes your way. Often we get so wrapped up in controlling everything that we miss out. We might miss an answer we were waiting for, or an opportunity we’ve been wanting because it does not fit into the framework we’ve set up for ourselves.

We can make healthier decisions when we are in an objective head space. We can see what we need when we need it, and why we need it when we aren’t so focused on the minutiae.

Deeper Connections

Seeking a deeper spiritual connection with your higher power, the universe, or life? I found that once I gave up control in my life, truly gave it up, I had a deeper spiritual connection to those around me and the world at large.

I used to get so focused on the minutiae, but each time I slowed down, took the time to relax and go with the flow, I felt more at ease with myself and my placement in the world.

I also find that my compassion deepens for others and myself. My resiliency increases, and I am more accepting of what happens to me and around me. I am more willing to stand up for myself where I never could before, and be selfish in healthy ways.

Once I gave up control, I felt freer and in control, rather than out of control like I assumed I would feel.

Taking the Right Amount of Responsibility

Just as a reminder, when you give up control, you are still responsible for what happens in your life. You might be waiting for an answer, so what happens between asking the question and receiving that answer is your responsibility. We sometimes use giving up control as an excuse to sit around and be inactive. Instead, we should continue to be proactive in our lives. Seek other answers while waiting for a specific one.

Sometimes we don’t get an answer, or it’s not the one we want, and that’s okay. Consider the timing wrong, and ask again later. Look at it as a roadblock, and find a way to adapt around it.

Whatever you do, when you surrender control, view it as a chance to be more free and active in your life.


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letting-go-of-control

Turning It Over

I struggle with letting go of control. Ash will tell you this should you ask him. When I get into a micro-managing state, it’s one of the quickest ways for me to experience an exacerbation. When I feel out of control, I tighten my grip to control everything around me, and then I stress out because I feel out of control. While I haven’t had a significant exacerbation in several years, my brain fog, L’Hermittes Sign, and neck twinges when I start down the path of stressing out. 

I’ve learned I have had to say to myself, “I can’t control everything, so I need to stop,” and attempt to go with the flow no matter what direction that might take. But I can slip back into bad habits of wanting to control everything and then I start stressing out again.

It’s a vicious cycle.

And usually feeling out of control helps bring that about. I’ve learned that I cannot control everything, and for the most part I do well to go with the flow of everything, but then I slip back into bad habits of wanting to control everything around me and then I get back into that space of feeling out of control and stressed.

It’s a vicious cycle.

When we have a particular life philosophy, we are often told to let go and give up control. And there’s something to that – it’s just got to be done in a healthy and reasonable manner. I have found what works for me, and so it’s important that you find what works for you.

I’ve learned I have had to say to myself, “I can’t control everything, so I need to stop,” and attempt to go with the flow no matter what direction that might take. But I can slip back into bad habits of wanting to control everything, and then I start stressing out again.

Depending on your life philosophy, or belief system, we are often told the importance of giving up control. That may be to a higher power, the universe, or just in general. That’s solid advice no matter your background: recognizing what you can control, what you can’t, and letting go of what you can’t.

When we have a particular life philosophy, we are often told to let go and give up control. And there’s something to that – it’s just got to be done in a healthy and reasonable manner. I have found what works for me, and so it’s important that you find what works for you.

Letting Go of Our Worries

If you have a higher power, you are at an advantage to someone who does not, because many belief systems teach the importance of giving up control to a higher power. If you don’t have a particular belief system, you have to remind yourself not to be so controlling and go with the flow. It’s a built-in reminder that those without a higher power do not have. But if you don’t have a higher power, that’s fine, you just have to remember to say, “it’s okay, I don’t need to control everything.”

Struggle with giving up control? Well, if you have a belief system, seek out direct texts that teach you to give up control. If you can’t find anything there that speaks to you, seek out secondary books, usually written by scholars, that might speak to the matter.

If you don’t have a belief system, consider mindfulness techniques to bring you back to the present moment. When you focus on the present, the moment you are in now, you cannot try to control everything around you. Center yourself at the moment and find ways to let go of the control you are fighting to hold. Look to your health as a starting point: I must let go of control to better tend to my health.

Finding the Balance

This brings up the question: who is responsible for our lives? Us? Our Higher Power? The Universe? Something else?

That’s an answer only you can decide. I cannot tell you, nor can I presume to suggest the correct answer. What I can do is tell you what worked for me, but that does not mean it will work for you.

For myself, I gave up personal responsibility when I had a specific higher power. I gave that higher power responsibility for my life, my happiness, and at times, my actions. I gave up too much control to this higher power. They were not responsible for my specific actions or responses to a situation, though I said they were as a means of absolving bad behaviors.

When I took responsibility for my actions and reactions to situations, I found a more profound peace within myself because I was able to feel more in control of my life. Even though things happened to me, outside of my control, I recognized that my response to those things was something I could control. It was about finding a balance between what I could control and what I could give up.

Figure out the balance in your own life: what responsibility can you take on for yourself, and what control you can let go. When you recognize that there are elements in life beyond your control, such as your chronic illness, you can start to lower your stress.

Acceptance of What We Cannot Change

Another advantage people with a higher power have over those who do not have one, is it allows for recognition for what cannot be changed and force us to move forward. Without a higher power, there needs to be a reminder to move forward in life, despite the roadblocks. People can place their trust in the higher power to see them through and take comfort in that.

Without a higher power, we must seek comfort elsewhere. We must trust that life will guide us through the process and that a coincidence will pop up to allow us to move forward or find an alternative. Often, life provides us with this when we aren’t expecting it. So remember to expect nothing, but accept everything to embrace an opportunity when it arises.

Moving Forward

It’s not easy to give up control, whether to a higher power or just in general. It’s never going to be easy, no matter how often we might need to do it. Why? Because control allows us to feel empowered. When we give up control, we lose a sense of power.

But if we want to move forward in life, if we’re going to begin to heal the emotional wounds caused by a chronic illness, we must give up control over things we cannot control. Whether that is to your higher power or to something else, when you give up control, you begin the process to move forward in life.

Life moves us in a forward momentum whether we like it or not, we might as well accept that movement and find ways to work with it, rather than against it.


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The Power of Others

When dealing with a chronic illness, it is sometimes our deepest desire to enlist the help of others. We might be too afraid to ask on the surface, but unconsciously we desire connection to others, especially when we feel alone. Often people want to help us, but can’t or don’t know how best to do so. Sometimes the best thing they can do is pray or send positive thoughts our way.

Is the concept of “thoughts and prayers” actually helpful? Or is it something we say to each other, and accept on our behalf as low-effort?

I think it boils down to your perspective. If you are a glass-half-full person, then having someone pray or reflect on you is helpful. If you are a glass-half-empty person, then it might be a hollow offer.

How can others help you through your health crisis? If you are new to my blog, please review this month’s disclaimer before reading any further.

The Power of Prayer (or Positive Thoughts)

As a teenager, I remember sitting and listening to my religious leader “cite” a study on the effect of prayer for those in crisis. I use quotes not to disparage, but because the leader was extremely vague about the study, the details, and did not provide resources to find the study on our own.

Reflecting back, I believe they were referring to Dr. Randolph C. Byrd’s 1988 study, “Positive therapeutic effects of intercessory prayer in a coronary care unit population.” The study found that participants who received intercessory prayer fared better in their follow-up appointments than those in the control group, who received no prayer at all.

Unfortunately, subsequent studies found that Dr. Byrd’s 1988 study to be at best flawed, and at worse irresponsible. Relying on prayer, regardless of the religion, to heal a patient can prevent the patient from receiving the necessary medical intervention needed to help with the illness. Each study that comes out relating to prayer and health finds little correlation between prayer and improvement of health.

Here comes the “but…”

While prayer itself may not change the outcome of a medical diagnosis, there is something behind knowing that others are thinking about you. It may not improve your health, but do you feel comfort when you know others tell you they are thinking/praying about you?

Unfortunately, I ran into a bunch of dead-ends in my research for this post surrounding the benefits of having others think about you. Current trends are to not worrying about what others think, and focusing solely on self-care. Both of these are positive in its own right, but it doesn’t answer the question: what are the benefits knowing others are thinking about us?

What I am about to say is speculative and unscientific: I believe knowing others think about you, whether it’s via prayers or positive thoughts, provides comfort. It allows those of us with a chronic illness to know we aren’t alone. Others may not know our experience, we may be alone (mentally) in our disease, but when others care for us to spend a few moments out of their day to reflect on our journey, it means a lot.

Going Beyond “Thoughts and Prayers”

If you are reading this as a friend or family member of someone with a chronic illness, there are some things you can do to stretch out your “thoughts and prayers” for them.

Use the time you reflect on them and find ways you can help. Sometimes, when we say we’re thinking about someone, it’s the most we can do. That’s fine, but consider doing something in their honor.

What You Can Do to Help

  1. If the person is dealing with a massive health crisis, consider getting yourself screened. For example, if they have cancer, try to get tested for that particular form of cancer. Or, get yourself screened as a potential donor for them or in general.
  2. Learn all you can about their health crisis and be better prepared for how to engage with the patient. In your research, find out what other patients say about the “dos and don’ts” in conversations.
  3. Donate money in the person’s honor towards research for their illness.
  4. Share across social media the latest information and research on the illness, but make sure to get their consent before tagging them.
  5. If you can physically help the person, take them to appointments or for a social outing of their choosing.

There are many other ways you can help someone with a chronic illness to extend the efficacy of thinking about them. You just have to find what works best for you and them.

Powerlessness and Control

Often, those in our lives feel powerless when we get a chronic illness diagnosis. They stand beside us, hold our hand, and do everything to help us manage our illness and still feel like they can do more.

Prayer or reflecting on us is an additional way to feel like they are helping. It’s calling on a higher power or the universe to intercede on our behalf. While the answer may never come, or be positive, it’s yet another way for our friends and family to feel in control in an out of control situation.

Sometimes saying “I will pray/keep you in my thoughts,” is enough to empower the person to go beyond the statement and spring into action.

When faced with powerlessness, the smallest action can help someone regain a sense of control. Next time someone says, “I am thinking about you,” think not of it as a common thing we say when there’s nothing to say, but rather a way of providing comfort at the moment.


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