Revisiting a Phone Detox

On Monday, I decided to take a much-needed break from my phone and putting restrictions on my usage for Jai’s sake and my own. I found the process both daunting and freeing and plan to keep the forward momentum I’ve gained by limiting my phone usage.

How the Week Went

Overall, I found myself to be more productive.

While I still found I spent a lot of time on my phone, it was doing more productive work like checking my social media accounts for the blog, interacting with other bloggers, and whatnot. But more importantly, I found myself no longer making excuses for getting ahead and working on some side projects that have been on the backburner for a while.

I am not surprised at how much of a distraction my phone is in my life.

I suspect that I use it as a tool to keep me from pursuing more important personal goals. I am someone who has an insecurity when it comes to the threat of failure, so I use my phone as a means to distract myself from the task at hand. If I don’t complete a task I’ve set out for myself, I can’t fail. It really doesn’t make sense when you look at it objectively.

The point is this: my phone was used as a means to keep me stagnant. I waste time doing unimportant tasks with no tangible benefit in order to avoid tangible productivity that pushed me out of my comfort zone. This week I turned towards more tangible tasks.

I worked off of my paper planner more which increases my productivity versus my electronic calendars and apps. Try as I might, I can’t get away from the allure of physically writing something down as a means to commit something to memory or plan something out.

The Most Difficult Part

Night time was the hardest time to manage because I tried to ration my time out with my various apps to save for bedtime. I have a very bad habit of needing to use my phone to fall asleep. Looking at a phone screen up to three hours before going to sleep can affect you sleep health and habits. I fall asleep most nights with my phone on and in my hand.

Not good.

I bought a dimmable book light and pulled some books I’ve been meaning to read and put them by my head to help facilitate the process of turning to books as a means of falling asleep rather than my phone. I’m not quite there yet, but I am getting there.

Kat, a blogger at the Lily Cafereminded me of this on Monday: remove the phone from the bedroom altogether. Having at least one phone is a good idea in case of an emergency so it would have to be Ash’s, but I should probably leave my phone charging in the kitchen at night.

It will prevent me from reaching for it when I wake in the middle of the night. I find that once awake and on my phone, I have a harder time falling asleep. I start thinking about things as I read social media or I get wrapped up in banal game tasks that an hour or two has passed without me falling back to sleep.

Known Personal Benefits

On the nights I didn’t instinctively reach for my phone I found that I slept better and felt more refreshed in the morning. This, in turn, helped boost my productivity.

By reincorporating books in my daily life I am rediscovering the joy I had of reading. I’ve been listening to audiobooks for the past couple of years because it’s easier to have on in the background when chasing a toddler.

Jai is also helping reignite my love: he will sit for extended periods of time in his room just flipping through his books. He’s not reading, we’re nowhere near that yet, but he is looking at the pictures and seems to enjoy whatever is internally playing out in his head.

Some days I am able to entice him to naptime by putting a favorite board book in the crib and he’ll sit contentedly flipping through the book until he falls asleep or throws it out of the crib.

This week I’ve taken to reading my books to him. They are dry, boring parenting books, but books I’ve been meaning to read for the blog and for myself. I read during the times I would be on my phone to distract myself while he engaged in independent play. Sometimes he wants to hear me read, other times I read silently.

Either way, it feels good to be doing that again. I feel guilty about reading books while in graduate school because I feel like I should be reading academic books rather than pleasure or enrichment books. I am learning to let go of that guilt and just enjoy the hobby that drove me to graduate school.

I also feel my time spent with Jai is more meaningful and no longer squandered. Sitting in a corner of his room while on my phone always felt like I was taking his toddler moments for granted. My biggest fear is to look back on my life and regret spending time on my phone rather than interacting with him.

I do not believe every waking moment should be spent interacting with Jai, having the independent play and alone time away from mommy is good for his development, but I also would rather spend my idle time doing something productive and less distracting. My absorption in my phone is so full that it can be hard to break away versus I find it easier to put a book down when he needs my attention.

Moving Forward

This week was a small step in decreasing my dependence on technology. I had my moments where I had to pause app limits because it was necessary to spend an extra five minutes on a problematic app for communication purposes.

I find that I still used my phone more than I would like, but it was getting down to a more acceptable time sink.

I plan on keeping my app blocker and further limit my technology usage by incorporating productivity extensions on my browser. I don’t want to stop using technology for fun altogether because as I stated on Monday, technology has always been a hobby since childhood, I just want to manage that time better and make sure it doesn’t take up all of my time.

Technology isn’t the enemy in my life, it’s a fantastic tool that I want to use and embrace. I just want to make sure that I am being healthy both as a means of achieving my personal goals and avoiding stagnation while modeling balanced behavior for Jai as he gets older.

 


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Checking In: MS Symptoms

What good is discussing diet and lifestyle changes if I don’t reveal the ongoing results?

Doing an honest self-assessment of any sort is hard, particularly when trying to find ways to manage an unmanageable disease. There’s a huge desire to make everything a “success” or engage in placebo effect-like thinking, but that isn’t always the case.

Overall, I feel like I am managing my MS better, but on a day-to-day basis, my mileage may vary because of various external factors.

Current Health Self-Check

Currently, I am not doing so well. Not necessarily because of the MS, but I have a weird seasonal head cold. Drippy nose, sore throat, and exhaustion. I can only assume that if a person without MS gets a cold like this they may feel wiped out but are able to go about their daily lives with minimal interference.

With MS and any illness, I get so wiped out that getting out of bed is a hardship. Ash had to stay home until Jai went down for his morning nap on Tuesday because I was so worn out. I needed the extra couple of hours of sleep this afforded me before I was able to start the day and take care of a toddler. Jai and I stayed in our PJs and read lots of books and minimized movement so I wouldn’t overdo it.

This is a key example of why getting sick with MS is “dangerous.” It won’t necessarily cause any physical harm, but infections are a key cause of flare-ups so there is a risk of needing to get steroids to treat the inflammation. I don’t get avoidant if I know someone is sick, but I do recognize that even a simple cold can knock me off my feet for a couple of days that might just inconvenience someone else.

Normally I wouldn’t write about getting sick factoring into how I am currently feeling because I tend to not get sick all that often, but since having Jai it has become a more common occurrence. 

Beyond the cold, I am feeling okay overall. There’s been some emotional disappointment in not being able to maintain my diet as strictly as I wanted, but doing what is best for my overall health is more important. My brain fog and memory issues haven’t gone away or lessened it, but that may be because I am not doing enough mental exercises to help stimulate neuron repair.

Fatigue is still an issue, but not so much on the days that I am more active. I find high-cardio days means that I have more energy throughout the day and days I do yoga there might be a greater dip in energy by the afternoon.

Being completely honest: I haven’t noticed many changes since my last check-in after my diet reset. I feel more active, happier, less sluggish, but no appreciable changes to my MS symptoms.

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Love after Baby

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Today’s post is about how Ash and my love evolved since having Jai. While we never made sweeping romantic gestures before, how we overtly express our love has changed since adding Jai to our family.

It has been an adjustment that we are still working through because that’s how relationships work.

The small gestures…the simple ways to express our love for each other has always been important. That hasn’t really changed because they are easy to do. When Ash sings a made up song to me or buys my favorite candy (back when I ate sugar), it makes me feel special. He loves it when I scratch his back without being asked or bring him his favorite custom drink after a run.

I find that we count on the simple stuff more as gestures of: “I recognize how you enjoy this and want to do it for you because it makes you happy” moments.

While it isn’t necessary to go overboard with our overtures of love, it is important that we don’t get complacent with our actions. Complacency leads to taking each other for granted, something neither of us want to do. How we express and strengthen our love will change as Jai gets older and as we age, so anything we come up with will evolve as time goes on.

Maintaining flexibility and understanding that our time is more precious has helped us have compassion for ourselves and each other.

Making Time

It takes the fun out of romantic spontaneity, but Ash and I have had to schedule our time together.

It doesn’t have to be time for that, but just spending time together.

We fell into a schedule of spending time on the couch after putting Jai to bed by chance. I am sure most relationship experts would say that the time we spend on the couch watching our shows or playing games on our phone is not quality time, but Ash and I would argue that it is quality time.

Our relationship has always been one of being near each other. We don’t have to talk about anything – we don’t have to be doing the same thing, but we find contentment in being near one another. Being able to reach over and touch the other’s arm when we need contact is worth more to us than an hour-long discussion about our day.

That isn’t to say that we don’t talk to each other, we do. But all our time spent together does not need to be at full engagement.

Prior to having Jai, we’d do more active things together: we’d go out, have friends come over, and other things couples without children do. That has had to change, obviously, and we’ve become more homebodies because of it.

This wasn’t a hard adjustment for Ash – he will proudly tell you that he’s a misanthrope and he likes that we stay in more. I am the more social one of the two of us, so when there’s an opportunity to go out with friends I tend to take it while Ash stays at home with Jai.

He loves the opportunity to spend alone time with Jai since he works all day. I just appreciate the break.

That said, we do try to schedule at least one day/evening a month away from Jai. My parents are gracious enough to watch Jai while Ash and I go do something fun: dinner, movie, play, or just walking around downtown. Those moments, because they are more infrequent, are savored because it allows us a few hours to be a couple again.

We still rush home to Jai because we love spending time with the little guy, but we also feel re-engaged with our relationship after a few hours alone. It gives us a chance to show how much we appreciate spending time together when there’s some effort involved.

Listening to Each Other

The other thing that changed a lot for us is that we listen more.

We talked, compromised, worked through our issues prior to Jai, but it has become more imperative that we take the time to listen.

If I’ve had a particularly stressful day, I preface anything that I need to discuss with: “now, I am not mad at you, but I may need to raise my voice in your general direction. Do not think I am yelling at you.” He understands that in that moment I need to vent about something and it needs to be heard by an adult and not just one of the cats. He will sit, listen, and then ask if I want advice or input.

Some days I want input, most days I am just venting, and I already have a solution worked out.

Likewise, when Ash needs me to listen to him, I try to hear him out. I do feel like our relationship is a bit lopsided because almost nothing bothers Ash. When he needs me to listen – I try to be there for him. Most of the time he has a great idea on how we can parent Jai and so I try to incorporate it into my routine.

Little One Makes 3

We’ve had to incorporate Jai in how we express our love for one another: in the moments that all three of us are sitting together reading a book or playing a game Jai has invented, I feel more connected to Ash. It may be biological, but when I watch him care for our child – I can’t help but feel a deeper connection to him.

And in those moments, I try to let him know how much I love him by giving him a quick peck on the cheek, a simple touch on his arm, or a hug (which Jai loves to join in). Growing up my parents would make a “Debbie sandwich” where they would hug each other while holding me between them. Those were always my favorite because as a child – I could feel both my parents love for me and their love for each other in that moment.

We try to show our love for each other in front of Jai because it’s healthy for him to see a loving adult relationship. We want to model healthy love so when he grows up, he will foster a similar relationship with his partner and feel comfortable coming to us for advice.

The Takeaway

For Ash and me, we have come to a place where we appreciate the time spent together and don’t rely so much on how it is spent together. Being physically close to one another is so much more important to us than anything else, which is why going out on frequent dates isn’t as much of a priority.

If there was ever a moment where one of us was unhappy with the situation (bored with another night in, needing to do something different, etc.), we make sure to talk and be open to listening. We may have to compromise because going out takes more logistical work with Jai, but at least we feel heard and a solution is at hand. Sometimes the simple act of talking is enough to soothe any needs.

It hasn’t been easy – most relationships, romantic or otherwise, are difficult to some degree. But knowing that I get to spend the evening with my best friend and go to bed beside him always warms my heart and makes me feel full. I am very fortunate to have found a person who appreciates the same things I do, has similar needs and desires, and wanted to share their life with me. And helps make cute babies.

And since I know he’s reading this: Ash, I love you. Happy Valentine’s Day.


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A Different Type of Love

A few months before I met Ash, I had an acquaintance confide in me that they didn’t love their partner as much as they loved their newborn.

The love, they said, for their partner was replaced with a deeper love for the baby.

They felt guilty by this shift in the relationship, but knew that this was necessary to being a good parent.

I wasn’t sure how to respond because I wasn’t a parent and I wasn’t in a relationship, so I did what any awkward single person would do: I nodded and affirmed that they had nothing to feel guilty about. It made perfect sense to me: love for a partner could easily be replaced with love for a child. Biologically, we are geared towards wanting to care for our offspring more in order to ensure its survival into adulthood.

They were talking about simple biology and I had no reason to disagree. I asked if they told their partner about this shift in relationship dynamics. They hadn’t at the time, but that was a very difficult conversation, so I didn’t blame them.

Now that I am nearly a year-and-a-half into parenthood, I remembered our conversation: the aquaintance wasn’t wrong about the shifting love. The love I have for Jai is deeper than the love I have for Ash, but it is a different type of love.

I still love Ash deeply, more so every day because of all that he does for his family, but the love I have for Ash is completely different from the love I have for Jai.

Different Types of Love

Psychologically speaking, there are 7 different types of love. For Ash, my love is more nuanced and a combination of erosludusand pragma. Whereas my love for Jai is storge and therefore completely platonic in nature.

So it isn’t that I love Ash or Jai more/equally I just cannot compare or measure the love for either because the love is so different.

The fact that my acquaintance was concerned about this conundrum is not unusual: there are plenty of forum posts and articles out there where mothers admit to loving their children more than their partners.

Unfortunately, what does not seem to be addressed is that the love between partners and the love between parent/child has to be different. I feel like this is obvious, but there shouldn’t be the same sort of sexual feelings for the child that would happen with a partner.

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Parenting with a Disability

This is the final week in a 3-week series on parenting observations. Week one is based on gentle parenting, week two is about parenting with compassion, and week three is about parenting with a disability.

These posts are based on my personal experiences as a parent and are not meant in any way to judge other parenting styles or decisions. I am offering my personal research and conclusions as possible suggestions for others out there, therefore these posts will be as objective as possible. When it comes to parenting: provided the method isn’t abusive, there really isn’t a wrong way to parent your child. Be secure and do what works best for you and your family and ignore outside judgment.


For many people, parenthood is fraught with challenges: getting enough sleep, the terrible twos, and the need for independence as children grow older. For a select few, there is the added challenge of balancing parenting and a disability of some sort.

Parenting without a disability is difficult and parenting with one presents its own unique challenges. With some adaptations, parenting with a disability is no harder than parenting without one. Remember: it’s comparing apples and oranges; each type is difficult and easy in their own ways.

The key is to know what the limits are, having a support system of some sort to help manage those limitations, and keeping everything in proper perspective.

In the final week of my parenting series, this week will be based more on observations from my own experience coupled with resources found online. If you are a parent with a disability, you may see some similarities in your own situation or if you know a parent with a disability, hopefully, this will provide some greater insight to what they experience.

Nota bene: This post will be using the universal “you/second person” pronouns throughout, so while it may not speak to your experience directly, it may apply to someone else you know.

Visible versus Invisible

There are two different types of disabilities out there: the ones you can see and the ones you cannot. For people with invisible disabilities, this can lead to a lot of issues, particularly if a person looks “normal” but uses a handicap parking space. A person does not need to be in a wheelchair, despite the universal logo, to be disabled.

Multiple Sclerosis can be both: for those with PPMS and SPMS (and at times, RRMS), it’s a more obvious disability. The person can be a cane, walker, or scooter. It can be abnormal speech patterns, cognitive difficulties, or physical weakness. The outside observer can see the disability.

But many with RRMS don’t display outward symptoms of their diagnosis, yet the disability can still be there: fatigue, mental fog, or pain. Flare-ups can cause limb weakness or numbness which several limits mobility for a short period of time.

When it is hard to see the disability, it is hard for outsiders to understand the extent of the disability. This can lead to feelings of frustration, inadequacy, and self-doubt by the person with the diagnosis.

Parenting with an invisible disability adds an additional layer of complications: sometimes it’s hard to make playdate plans with others because you don’t know how you might feel that day, remembering simple details about another kid’s life that you’ve been told many times before, and seeming more disengaged with the parenting process from the outside. None of these reasons make you less of a parent, it just alters how you parent.

Ultimately, for those with an invisible disability, they can spend part of their day mentally preparing for outside judgment because people might not know or understand the situation. Judgment isn’t a daily occurrence, but when it happens, it stings because you are left feeling inadequate.

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