Activities for a Rainy Day

What is summer without some rain?

As adults, rain can be nice because it means a cozy day inside with books, a great TV show, and delicious snacks. But for kids, rainy days are the enemy. No outdoors depending on the amount of rain and limited active games inside so the house doesn’t get destroyed.

I remember it being particularly rough when it felt like I had nothing to do. Those were the worst days where it was physically draining to think of something to do while stuck inside.

With a little one obsessed with spending time outside, it’s hard to say “no” when Jai wants to go out despite the rain. Some days I am able to accommodate him, but other days it’s storming really bad or I don’t feel getting wet myself.

Below are some activities I’ve come up with the help combat boredom on rainy days for Jai. As he gets older, the activities will evolve to be more age-appropriate and reflect his desires.

Make Rainy Days a Special Occasion

This required some planning ahead, but I have a set of toys and books that only get pulled out when we have a rainy day. It makes the day a little more special and exciting for him. It’s the same concept behind packing a special travel bag for kids that have a special set of toys – if the item is “new” to him, he will spend time playing with it rather than asking to go outside.

One such toy is an indoor bowling set. While he doesn’t understand the concept of bowling just yet, he loves rolling the ball or knocking over the pins. Jai has a vehicle that moves forward with the push of a button, so we line it up with the pins to knock them over.

It’s hilarious. For him and for us to watch his enjoyment of the game.

I also make special snacks and drinks for the day that he won’t normally get in good weather. This includes popcorn, chocolate “milk” (a coconut milk and date-sweetened drink), and herbal teas. I try to make sure they are healthy in nature, but the chocolate milk feels like a real treat for him.

Finally, I try to limit his screen time on a daily basis. Right now he’s obsessed with a song from a popular children’s movie, so I have to play that at least three times a day on a streaming site. But we try to make that the extent of his screen time. So on rainy days I will pull out his favorite PBS kids show or play the movie his favorite song is from.

The TV is a wonderful thing, but by limiting it to rainy days it becomes a treat that makes it easier to turn on and off when I need to and less of a fight when it’s time to do something different. I don’t know how long this attitude will last, but I am not taking it for granted.

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Beating the Heat with MS

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Multiple Sclerosis is no fun. Especially in the summertime.

Around this time of year, every year, I find that my energy and motivation wanes and my productivity level drops. I am pretty hard on myself, always having high expectations of my abilities and what I can get accomplished on a day-to-day basis, so any time I feel like I am doing less than what I could be doing, I get really down on myself.

I recognized that there is a pattern to my productivity levels depending on the temperature outside. On the cooler days of late fall, winter, and early spring I am able to get more done every day. It isn’t perfect or guaranteed, I am just more likely to get everything done that I want.

But once late spring, summer, and early fall hits, when the really hot and humid days sink in, I find that I am lucky to get more than two major things done on my to-do list. Most days require me taking a nap and if I push myself through it (and therefore too hard), I won’t get anything done past a certain time in the day.

Weekends are the hardest. I am so worn out chasing Jai around all week that when I get the opportunity to stay in bed for most of the day while Ash does the “heavy” lifting, I do. And then very little gets done on my to-do list.

There is a definite correlation between my productivity and the weather.

And I am not imagining it.

Heat & MS

It’s well-known that MS and heat do not go hand-in-hand. Many other MS patients find that the heat can be particularly draining, possibly due to electrical connections between neurons no longer being efficient from the heat. Because of this, flare-ups are more common, especially for those who suffer from spasticity.

In researching this post, I learned something I didn’t know: prior to MRIs and other efficient tests to diagnose MS, patients were submerged in hot water baths to gauge their symptom reactions to the heat.

I find this fact particularly interesting considering my intense love of hot, hot showers. Ash does not understand why I love them so much. And now I don’t know why I love them so much, I don’t find that it affects my body in a negative way, in fact, I find them extremely relaxing and soothing. I should try some lower-temperature showers to see how it impacts my energy level for the day. I may be negatively impacting my productivity in favor of a hot shower.

The recommendations by medical professionals are for MS patients to avoid the heat and humidity as much as possible. Some recommendations go so far as to tell patients to move to better climates. This is all well and good, but sometimes it’s unavoidable, not economically feasible, or we don’t want to let the weather affect our social plans.

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Someday Wish: Hiking the Appalachian Trail

Last weekend we went camping by the approach trail for the Appalachian Trail (AT) in the North Georgia mountains.

It was my first time at the approach after hearing so much about this place for twenty+ years. Growing up in New England, particularly next to the AT, you were familiar with the six-month journey from Georgia to Maine. As a child, it was this nebulous start point in the state of Georgia which was a place you didn’t want to spend a lot of time in for various reasons.

For almost ten years to the day I’ve been living in Georgia, but I hadn’t made it close to the start of the AT until now. It was a goal to visit the trailhead (in some capacity) while living in the Southeast.

Growing Up Next to the Trail

As a child, seeing AT hikers was a frequent occurrence in the late-spring into mid-fall. When I was in high school I would see them walking along the road across the street on their way to the next section of trail. Sometimes they would stop on the embankment for a railroad line and some students would shout out the window at them.

Teenagers.

As I got older, I would see them along the road on my way to work. They would come into my place of employment to clean up in the bathroom and re-up their food supplies (it was a great place to shop for the vegan hikers). I never really got into much of a conversation with them as they came through my line, mainly because I didn’t even know what to say. Most left their packs outside, but you could always tell given the tired, dusty look on their faces.

I also hiked sections of the trail, but no more than a few miles at a time. I always enjoyed my time on the trail, but couldn’t imagine what it was like to hike over two thousand miles of the trail.

Someday…

When I found out what these hikers were doing, hiking from Georgia to Maine, I always wanted to try the journey myself. But I always thought myself incapable due to lack of physical fitness. As I got older, I found the idea of exerting myself every day for an extended period of time fatiguing (I blame my undiagnosed MS at the time).

Now that I’ve made significant lifestyle changes and feel better – the idea of going six months of hard physical labor every day no longer seems impossible. I understand there’s a lot of planning and prepping that goes into hiking the entirety of the trail, but I finally have the confidence that one day I will be able to do it.

I have built up my fitness goals. I completed a half-marathon, but I have the following “someday goals”:

  • Run a marathon
  • Compete in a Triathlon
  • Hike the AT
  • Stretch someday: Climb Mount Everest

Having my MS under control will also help my ability to hike the trail. It might take me a little longer than most people, but the more active I get and aware of my daily limitations, I think I could do it. I will have to wait until Jai is older either to take him with me, or he’s out of the house so he can go six-months without needing to see me. Either way, I will need to wait to go with a partner as the trail isn’t safe for a woman to go it alone. I don’t think I could convince Ash to go with me…

In the meantime…

Because it’s going to be several years before I am ready to hike the AT, but I know someone who is currently part of the 2018 AT Class: A Worthwhile Adventure. She’s blogging her journey fairly frequently so it’s enjoyable to see the pictures and read all about the literal ups and downs of her journey. I highly recommend subscribing to her blog to follow her exciting adventure through Appalachia.

What are some of your personal fitness or adventure goals? Would you ever spend six months on such a goal? Leave a comment below.


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Featured photo credit: Michelle Melton Photography


Recovering with Nature

When I began my health journey nearly a year ago, I wasn’t sure what direction I would take. Honestly, I thought I would give up, go back to my old habits, and be on MS medication by now.

In the back of my mind, I had very few pleasures: eating sugar, fried foods, and not exercising.  These were things I did to self-sooth and help me cope with stress and my diagnosis.

It was my pattern. To try something new, get discouraged, and then give up on it.

This particular venture worked out differently. I think because I am blogging it allows for a level of accountability, perhaps if I didn’t maintain this blog I would have given up sooner. Back in November, I went through a period where I didn’t post as often as I wanted. It may have been discouragement (“is this something really worth doing? I am putting a lot of time into something with little to no feedback”), but I think I was also just busy with life and not sure if I wanted to continue regardless.

Somehow I stuck through it and I’ve continued to notice positive changes. I’ve lost weight, I feel happier, I feel more balanced, and I think I’ve fully accepted my diagnosis. I was on the path of acceptance several years ago, but I really embodied the “things I cannot change” attitude since August.

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I Wish I Knew: Toddlers

This is the final part in my series  “I Wish I Knew.” Read about what I wish I knew relating to pregnancy, birth, and babies in parts onetwo, and threeThis post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure policy for more information.

Culturally speaking, toddlerhood is equal to teenage years when it comes to least favorite times to be a parent. Toddlers throw tantrums without regard to location or convenience, refuse to move, refuse to eat, and are all around terrors. Add a hundred more pounds and you’ve got a teenager.

The narrative is this: when someone asks how old your little one is and you answer somewhere between 1.5 and 3 years old, you get that look of “may God have mercy on your soul,” and the question of “so how bad are they? they must be going through their terrible twos?”

I had a neighbor make a comment about Jai’s age yesterday when he was mad I wouldn’t let him put all his sidewalk chalk in water. He whined a little, but soon got distracted by the neighborhood cat who came to visit.

What I Wish I Knew

I am at the very beginning of the “terrible twos” stage so I still have a lot of naiveté when it comes to how Jai is handling the whole situation. But something I wish someone had told me?

It’s really not that bad. It’s not easy, definitely not saying that it is easy, but it isn’t as bad as I’ve been lead to believe.

My mother told me that parenting is only as hard as you make it out to be, so if you don’t take the necessary steps to help foster certain behaviors you want and help them manage the behaviors you don’t, then there’s a chance you will end up with an unmanageable child. There are other factors at play in this scenario: means, temperament, and patience.

Lots and lots of patience.

There were things I wish my parents did or did not do when I was growing up, so I am making adjustments to my parenting to reflect what I think might have made a positive difference in my life and therefore in Jai’s life. I am hoping to remain flexible enough that when I see something isn’t working I can adjust it.

Because I am currently involved with this developmental stage, I wanted to offer my thoughts on the questions I asked other mothers as well.

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