Autumnal Love

Fall is my favorite season.

I love the crispness in the air, the smell of leaves on the ground, and the cooler weather that requires sweaters and a hot cup of pumpkin spice latte. That is before I moved South. I get none of these fall favorites until late November and even then if I am lucky.

I can’t complain because I am able to sit on a restaurant patio well into November with my flip-flops and that’s something I could never do in New England.

Living down South redefined fall for me. I still love it because the weather is more temperate, but it also means that I have to find new ways to appreciate the fall that are different from what I did up North.

Autumnal Love & Appreciation Month

For this month, I will be discussing some of my favorite fall activities: festivals, pumpkin patches, and Halloween celebrations. I will also reflect on how fall is the best month for those of us with MS, some easy exercises to stay active, and how to prepare for the holiday season glut of food.

As I mentioned yesterday, we’re moving to twice-a-week posting schedule for the rest of the year, but hopefully, maintain the same quality posts that you enjoy.

Before I finish out this post – leave a comment with your favorite fall activity or favorite part of the fall season. If you hate fall, let us know why! I always love to hear differing opinions.


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Featured photo credit: Michelle Melton


Food & September

Food is something I love and I love to share that love with others. I hope you enjoyed reading and trying some of the recipes – my favorites were the pumpkin spice latte and the celebration cake. Both go perfectly together and are relatively guilt-free if you’re watching what you eat.

I enjoyed sharing what I am doing with Jai to encourage his love of food and how I plan to minimize picky eating should it arise. Jai has already expressed an interest to help me in the kitchen which I hope to continue to foster into adulthood as much as possible.

We’re in the kitchen for some more goodies in the upcoming months that I am looking forward to sharing, so keep your eyes open (and make sure to follow MS//Mommy if you don’t already) for new and exciting recipes.

Looking ahead

There are going to be some changes in the next three months at MS//Mommy. I am dropping down to a twice-a-week posting schedule, so posts will be on Tuesdays & Thursdays instead of the Monday/Wednesday/Friday schedule.

If you follow my social media accounts, you’ll still see my “repost” Saturdays.

I wanted to spend the next couple of months working on some side projects relating to the blog and overhauls to the site now that I’ve been doing this for a year. To ensure that I am still providing quality posts, I decided that a twice-a-week schedule would be best for the rest of the year.

Speaking of social media accounts: if you don’t already follow me – please check out my Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Tumblr. There you’ll get extra articles, thoughts, and pictures relating to the blog.

Here’s to October – one of my favorite months of the year!


Like this post? Make sure to follow me on your favorite social media platform and show some love by sharing it. Links found below.

Featured photo credit: Michelle Melton


Raising a Lil Foodie

I’ve already mentioned how important to me it is for Jai to grow up loving food as much as I did. But teaching Jai to love food isn’t the only important thing. It’s also teaching him how to love the process of making food and learning to be open to the variety that food has to offer.

Food is one of those universal languages, like math, where it is an important form of communication that transcends language and cultural barriers. I found that my introduction to new cultures wasn’t from media, but taking an evening to try a different ethnic food. One of my fondest memories from undergraduate was spending late nights ordering Indian and watching Bollywood movies with my Pakistani roommates.

Food is tangible, hitting all of the senses, and doesn’t allow for an abstract appreciation of another culture, but an immersive appreciation. I can teach Jai all I want about his Indian/Portuguese/Puerto Rican/Irish/Italian heritage, but it will become more real when I make him dishes from each culture. It grants him a connection to his heritage that he can appreciate until we get an opportunity to visit these countries ourselves.

So including food as part of Jai’s education is important to me, so much so that I want to raise him to be a foodie. How millennial of me.

When I talk about raising a foodie, I understand all the negative connotations: it sounds so pretentious when a parent says “Quinoa is such a foodie. We raised them to love kale, microgreens, and only the finest truffle infused rapeseed oil.”

I am not looking to raise a kid who only eats gourmet ingredients. I want a kid that will look at a new dish and try to deconstruct it to see how it was made, if only as a mental exercise during mealtime.

More than anything, I want him to appreciate all the food placed before him and appreciate the work that goes into getting it there, whether at home or out at a restaurant. Read More


Food & Love

Food has long been considered a language of love.

My mother expressed her love for her family by cooking delicious dishes and passing her knowledge of cooking and baking to me. I plan to pass this love to Jai as he grows up so he will cook and bake for his family.

But before Jai, there was Ash. And before Ash, officially, there was the dating/courtship period of our relationship. At the time we met and started dating I was taking temp jobs, this was during the depths of the economic downturn, and so my resources were limited for what I could do with him for our dates.

Being a gentleman, he offered to pay, but being independent I refused to let him pay for more than one date in a row without us at least splitting the cost. Rather, I offered to make him dinner at his apartment, for him and his roommates, as often as I could. It allowed us to spend time together, watch some movies/shows we had common interests and keep our costs low. Additionally, I could show him something I was good at to impress him.

Getting to Know You

I met Ash at a restaurant for a mutual friend’s birthday party. We chatted for a bit, I was interested but unable to really pursue him at the time. Several months later we reconnected after hanging out at another friend’s house a couple of times and decided that we wanted to be more serious in our relationship.

Ash’s birthday is at the beginning of the year and at that point in our relationship I couldn’t find work, so I had no money to buy a special present for him. We’d been dating for two months at that point and he told me, as he still tells me, that I didn’t have to get him anything special for his birthday. I insisted, so he suggested making him dinner.

Ash has never been one to hide his love for meat. Specifically, red meat.

I found a recipe for grilled steak with herbed butter, potatoes, and green beans. I spent the better part of the day making it for him because I wanted it to be perfect. Up to that point, I had made what I considered safe meals. These were meals I knew I couldn’t screw up but didn’t really show my range. Here was an opportunity to show my abilities. Fortunately, it was a success and to this day he comments about how much he loved that birthday present.

From then on out, I spent more time expanding my culinary skills to impress Ash. I would ask what he wanted to eat, he would buy the ingredients and I would throw something together in his kitchen for him. Most days we shared with his roommates, but some days we kept it for ourselves while we watched anime.

I had one obstacle in my cooking that I wanted to overcome, because don’t all overly ambitious partners want to do this?

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My Love of Cooking (& Baking)

Every superhero has an origin story.

My superpowers reside in the kitchen. I am not going to put on false humility about it: I am a great cook and baker. Are there people who are better? Absolutely, and I am not going to be joining any competition shows because I know there are plenty of people who are better than me. But I am good.

Growing up, cooking and baking was an act of love for my mother. Every meal contained a lot of passion, care, and flavor. Seeing her work in the kitchen was inspiring and made me want to be like her. When I grew up, I wanted to have a family tied together by my cooking just like we were with hers.

What follows is my introduction to the art of cooking (& baking) and how I fell in love with it as a hobby.

A Childhood Introduction

My childhood home was centered around the kitchen as the main gathering place – for eating, cleaning, and chatting. Many hours were spent there – most of the time with my mom working and me just watching her prep, assemble, and make. I would stand behind the stove and chat about my day at school while she made dinner or dessert.

I absorbed all that she did while I watched her work. Many times I was asked to stir something while she moved onto the next step and other times I felt comfortable enough to ask her questions: how can you tell the candy is ready? why does the temperature of the oven matter? what does a clean knife mean after inserting it into the cake?

I never saw her get discouraged in her work. Frustrated, yes. But not discouraged. If a dish didn’t work out quite like she wanted, she never threw in the towel. She would look over the recipe and realize that most of the time it was written badly. Her cookbooks are littered with marginalia to direct her future self on how to make the recipe a success. 

I didn’t stay on the sidelines either. My real introduction occurred when my mom had me help her as a toddler, with my first project using cookie cutters for a batch of Christmas sugar cookies. I would press the cutter into the dough and many times the dough would come out with the cutter, stuck. I would pull this dough out of the cutter and pop it into my mouth. I think out of a potential batch of 24 cookies, we successfully made 18. It was my earliest experience as a quality control tester as well.

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