book-review-waiting-higher-power

Book Review: Waiting: A Non-Believer’s Higher Power

I’ve never been Marya Hornbacher’s target audience. I’ve never had an eating disorder, never diagnosed as bipolar, and I’ve never had to work to overcome a substance addiction. The closest I can come to her experience is getting diagnosed with OCD and learning to come to grips with my addiction to anger.

Twice in my life, I’ve found myself reading her books.

I first read Wasted back in the early-2000’s, possibly while still in high school. I went through a morbid stage, where I read a lot of real-life stories of those battling eating disorders. Her book was one of many, and I remember enjoying her writing style.

When I started searching for books to read for this month, books relating to a higher power, I wanted to go a non-traditional route. I tried to find a book told from a nonbeliever’s perspective. But not your typical atheist text, one filled with anger towards a particular higher power. I wanted one that examined if you could be spiritual without a higher power.

Marya’s book, Waiting, came back as a top result, and since I recognized her from Wasted, I decided to give it a go. I did not read a summary, nor did I research beyond the title, subtitle, and author. I placed it on hold from my local library and waited. It was a shock when I started reading it and realized I was not the target audience, again. Marya’s book is for people in the process of recovery who do not believe in a higher power*. But given how some popular recovery program’s require a higher power to work through the steps, there can be anxiety surrounding a lack of belief. Marya’s book fills that gap and provides comfort and assurance that a person can complete a program without belief.

Granted, it was my fault for not researching the book. I judged a book solely by its cover and as a result, found that it might not be for me.

But the book was for me. I may not be in recovery for substance abuse, I am in recovery for some equally destructive behaviors. Marya had plenty to say that applied in my own life, primarily as I work through the process of self-acceptance, and stepping outside of my addiction to anger.

So it ended up being a beautiful accident to read Waiting for this month’s book review. 

What follows is my review of a book I chose on my own. I did not receive any compensation for this review.

Book Information

Title: Waiting: A Nonbeliever’s Higher Power
Author: Marya Hornbacher
Date Published: 2011
Publisher: Hazeldon
Pages: 137
Genre: Spirituality/Recovery

Goodreads Link
Amazon Link (non-affiliate)
Official Book Website (non-affiliate)


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Surrendering Control

As a child, I heard about the importance of surrendering control, especially how it pertained to a higher power. While I spoke a bit on Monday about the importance of giving up control, this post is for those of us who cannot stand the idea of giving up control. When I heard the words “surrender control” growing up, I found that I would internally shudder at the thought. The word “surrender” in this particular context still irritates me years later.

I still haven’t quite identified why I hated the thought of surrendering control, even as a child. I suspect it has something to do with the abject vulnerability that comes from giving up control. I saw that the moments I was most vulnerable, I was also treated as though I was weak. So any display of vulnerability was a display of weakness. Surrendering was the ultimate sign of weakness.

Additionally, growing up, you are beginning to assert your independence. Being told to give up control, just as you are starting to come into control of your own life, feels like so many steps backward. I learned to associate giving up control as infantilizing. I could not differentiate between the “positive” forms of giving up control like going with the flow, and the “negative,” which was micromanaging all aspects of my life.

And so I became a control freak.

How to Give Up Control when You Can’t

It’s all well and good to be told to give up control. It’s one of those “easier said than done” situations.

But when it comes time actually to try and give up control, it can be difficult. I think for those of us who need to be in control are keenly aware of how out of control the world is, so we cling to whatever means to maintain a sense of order. We find areas in our lives we can manage, and even if we manage it poorly, there is some stability in the belief we are in control. 

Humans are masters of deception. Especially self-deception.

So, how do you surrender control?

Not easily, and I wish I were joking about that. This would be one of those areas where, if we could snap our fingers and fix everything, we would do it. I thought if I reflected on it hard enough, it would happen.

But it doesn’t work that way. Giving up control isn’t just a thought-based exercise. It requires active participation. I was seeking for something else to take control from me, even though it wasn’t for it to take, nor was I willing actually to give it. I couldn’t expect anyone, or thing, to take control. 

I, and I alone, could give up the control in my life. But I am like an addict, and to be sure, control is addictive, and addicts struggle to give up their drug of choice. While micromanaging my life brought on only stress, frustration, and health problems, I was unwilling to give up my “drug.”

Once I realized that I was responsible for my own burden, that the only way I would regain control in my life is to let it go, was I able to make a choice needed in the situation.

Now, if you have a higher power, you might say this: my teachings tell me to give up control. Many allegories teach to give to your higher power. Yes, but make sure you are actively giving up control and not expecting your higher power to take control from you. This is the trap I fell into. Make them your focal point, but remember that only you can say “I am going to give up control in this area of my life.”

Often, meditating or praying to that higher power or the universe can give you the strength you need to do so, so keep that in mind as well.

But it really has to be your decision to let go. Acknowledge that you are not in complete control of your life, that you are going to go with the flow, and accept whatever life hands you as graciously as possible.

Clear Head; Healthy Decisions

Control freaks: do you find that your head gets so cluttered with all that you have to do? All that you have to remember? All that you didn’t do, and now you feel frustrated?

The advantage of surrendering control is that it gives you a clearer head. No longer do you have to think about all the parts of your life you need to manage. You get a chance to prioritize what you can control and what you can’t. It allows you to reflect on your life more objectively.

Remember when I talked about not having expectations and accepting everything? No longer do you place expectations on your higher power or life to take control from you (you’ve given it over freely), and therefore, you can accept anything that comes your way. Often we get so wrapped up in controlling everything that we miss out. We might miss an answer we were waiting for, or an opportunity we’ve been wanting because it does not fit into the framework we’ve set up for ourselves.

We can make healthier decisions when we are in an objective head space. We can see what we need when we need it, and why we need it when we aren’t so focused on the minutiae.

Deeper Connections

Seeking a deeper spiritual connection with your higher power, the universe, or life? I found that once I gave up control in my life, truly gave it up, I had a deeper spiritual connection to those around me and the world at large.

I used to get so focused on the minutiae, but each time I slowed down, took the time to relax and go with the flow, I felt more at ease with myself and my placement in the world.

I also find that my compassion deepens for others and myself. My resiliency increases, and I am more accepting of what happens to me and around me. I am more willing to stand up for myself where I never could before, and be selfish in healthy ways.

Once I gave up control, I felt freer and in control, rather than out of control like I assumed I would feel.

Taking the Right Amount of Responsibility

Just as a reminder, when you give up control, you are still responsible for what happens in your life. You might be waiting for an answer, so what happens between asking the question and receiving that answer is your responsibility. We sometimes use giving up control as an excuse to sit around and be inactive. Instead, we should continue to be proactive in our lives. Seek other answers while waiting for a specific one.

Sometimes we don’t get an answer, or it’s not the one we want, and that’s okay. Consider the timing wrong, and ask again later. Look at it as a roadblock, and find a way to adapt around it.

Whatever you do, when you surrender control, view it as a chance to be more free and active in your life.


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Featured photo credit: Canva


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Belief, Positivity, and Chronic Illness

“Embrace the power of positive thinking!” We hear that all the time when we endure a health crisis, a rut, or embark on a wellness journey. We are told if we want to change our mindset or become healthier, we need to shift our thinking to be positive. It’s something I frequently promote on the blog. But that isn’t possible with a chronic illness. Sometimes we need a little extra help.

Can positive thinking help you manage your illness? What if you are feeling particularly low on positivity?

This is where a higher power or greater cause can step in to help. Belief comes from the same place in our brains, whether it’s religious or not. Having strong beliefs, no matter the source, helps us create a sense of community and support when we find others who are similar. Prayer or meditative practices can help quell darker emotions that arise in illness.

Depending on your perspective and your practices, it’s effortless to slip in positive thinking. You just have to use what you already know to work with you, rather than against you.

Positivity, Meditation, and Prayer

Nature works against us when we want to sit down and focus on the positive. Geared towards survival, we get caught in the negativity to help keep us safe. Yet, negative thinking causes so much mental and physical harm. We no longer need it to survive, yet it still follows us around.

Belief can help us ward off negative thoughts. If you have a higher power, you can engage in your practices to find comfort in the routine and tradition. If you don’t have a higher power, you can participate in relaxation/self-care exercises to help set your mind at ease.

Regardless of your background, when you want to start engaging in positive thinking, there are tools available to you. If you are religious, look into your texts, and any devotionals explicitly created for comfort. If you aren’t religious, there are a lot of secular and science-based books available to get you started.

Seek out someone more knowledgeable too: a leader in your community, life coach, or counselor. They can give you text, tools, and mantras equivalent to meditation or prayer.

Prayer, or self-reflection, help bring comfort to the practitioners. It can take the edge off of emotions, help you collect your thoughts, and self-soothe. Most importantly, it can give us a break we need to refocus our thoughts to be objective. While coping with a chronic illness, we sometimes sink into darkness and crisis. Prayer/meditation grants our brains the break we need to help see beyond the darkness.

If you have a higher power, you might hear them speak to you with words of comfort. If you don’t, you might gain a similar moment of peace while meditating. These practices serve as a wonderful means to distract us from our despair.

Is it Helpful?

Finding a sense of direction within your personal philosophy should always be helpful. Your belief system (of any kind) needs to bring you comfort, not additional stress. If you find that you aren’t getting the support you need, figure out what’s going on. You may need to re-examine your beliefs to see why it’s not fulfilling your needs.

When you are in a time of personal crisis, such as a diagnosis or exacerbation, you want something to draw your strength upon.

I found as I grew older that the philosophy I used as a child no longer worked or brought me comfort. It only brought anger and resentment. I needed to look elsewhere to draw support as I dealt with my MS and settled on one that I dabbled in since I was a teenager. It took me a long time to feel okay with this switch, but it was more important to care for my mental health than anything else.

If your philosophy works for you and brings you comfort, continue to find ways to keep it working for you. If not, then speak with someone objective: they might be able to healthfully redirect you to materials to help you reaffirm your beliefs. Examination and reflection is essential no matter your faith, or non-belief.

Keep trudging forward as you deal with your illness and continue to draw sources of strength close to you as a means of help.


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A Higher Power with a Chronic Illness

Approximately 84% of the world’s population is religious in some way. The number may be lower if we compare those who say they are religious, versus those who actively practice. It is safe to assume that the majority of the world has some sort of religious background. For many people, when dealing with a crisis or celebration of some sort, they reach to a higher power. This higher power connects humans to one another, reaffirms the community bond, and provides comfort in times of need. When dealing with a chronic illness, sometimes that higher power provides the strength needed to cope.

For September, the MS Mommy Blog will discuss the advantages, and at times the disadvantages, of having a higher power during a wellness journey. If you have one deity, more than one, or none at all, you’ll find that I will touch upon your situation at least once this month.

A Quick Disclaimer

If I linked you back to this post, it’s because of the following disclaimer.

The MS Mommy Blog takes a strict stance of not promoting one particular religious practice over another, nor will it disparage a specific system of belief. If I take lessons from one philosophy more often than another, it is not an endorsement.

Because this month will have a lot of conversations surrounding religion, I will be as broad and general as possible to be inclusive. If I do use specific examples or terminology associated with one particular religion, it won’t be to promote it over another. This has everything to do with the limitation of the English language and tap into Western cultural shortcuts.

All examples will be done in an honoring way: I will not criticize any particular system of belief. I will, however, address some of the mental traps we fall into as a result of religion, not because of the religion itself. This might be perceived as a criticism, but please do not take it as such.

To be all-encompassing, I will not be using the word “god” in any capacity. Instead, I will use the term “higher power” or “greater cause.” If you have a particular deity, that is your higher power. If you are not religious or an adherent to a traditional belief system, you might have a greater cause that you focus on (see humanism as an example of what I mean).

Looking Beyond Ourselves

Often, at the start of any wellness journey, there’s a call to look beyond ourselves. We might reach out to our higher power to help us start or give us the strength to move forward. Being afraid to try something new, no matter how beneficial it may be, is reason enough to need strength from wherever you can get it. If you are not religious, you may look for other motivations: a child, a partner, or just for yourself.

Whatever the reason, we are looking within to look beyond.

The act of asking a higher power for strength or finding a greater cause allows us to reflect on our life from an objective perspective. We can see ourselves as others see us, and see where we might need an extra boost. Then we can ask for help from our higher power, or see resources related to our greater cause. The act of asking for help is a form of externalizing our desire and can help propel us forward.

I often find that looking beyond myself helps. It’s usually in the form of providing an example to Jai, I see what I want him to do, and therefore, I must model my behavior, so he follows suit. I am looking beyond myself to make changes in my wellness journey, and I find more success because of it.

Finding Motivation Beyond, Maybe

If you grew up in a particular system of belief or are newly converted, you know what works for you. If reaching out to your higher power gets you the answers and comfort you need, then do so. But make sure whatever response you get back is honest and healthy. Sometimes we get a specific response (or lack of response), and it may not be our higher power, but our unconscious getting in the way. That’s the “maybe” in this section’s header.

If you are not receiving comfort or an answer encouraging your personal wellness, seek out a second opinion. Find a leader you trust within your belief community and seek counsel. Understand that they are fallible too, but your higher power should want you to be strong, find comfort, and be healthy. Your leader should help you get a more honest response that isn’t muddled with unconscious and discouraging thoughts.

No Excuses

Here’s where I am going to get controversial: do not use your higher power or greater cause as an excuse not to make positive life changes to manage your illness. Really think about what your higher power or greater cause asks of you. One that wants you to be healthy and managing your illness in the best way possible is reasonable. One that asks you to stay stagnant and be unhealthy may not be your higher power, but your own unconsciousness afraid of change.

If you find that after speaking with your higher power, it gives you an answer to stay unhealthy, you may need to seek outside counsel to get to the source of that answer.

Higher Power & Chronic Illness

So how can a greater cause or higher power help you with your chronic illness? That’s something we’ll be examining for September. You may have one, and you may not. Whatever works for you and keeps you motivated and feeling happy – that’s what matters most.

Your wellness journey is your own, and ultimately, you need to stick with what keeps you moving forward healthily.


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Setting Attainable Personal Goals

Setting Attainable Personal Goals

A few months back I was looking for an effective way to create a one-year and a five-year plan for myself as a means to set attainable personal goals.

I was tired of coming up with the idea of doing something with no actionable plan to achieve it. I would say to myself, “I want to achieve x,y, z,” but had no plan of action. Many meaningful life goals require more thought and attention to details than simply naming them.

It was at this point I did some research and found a system that helped me better organize my thoughts, create a plan of action and feel like I could attain my personal goals.

Setting SMART Goals

Want to feel smart? Try setting S.M.A.R.T. goals.

S.M.A.R.T. is a mnemonic device for “Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Timely.” Created back in the early-80’s by George Doran, Arthur Miller, and James Cunningham, S.M.A.R.T.  goal creation started off as a business tool that worked its way into personal usage over the years.

Each word acts as a writing prompt, a means to get you thinking about each aspect of the overall goal. When it comes time to figure out these five elements to your overall goal, you answer the question each word presents. The question might look something like this:

  • Specific: can you be clear & exact about your goal?
  • Measurable: how can you quantifiably assess your progress within your goal?
  • Achievable: how realistic is this goal and is it attainable?
  • Relevant: do you have other goals and how does this goal relate to them? How well does this goal relate to your current needs/desires?
  • Timely: what timeline do you see yourself achieving this goal?

For a really clear explanation for each word, Mind Tools has a fantastic page breaking each word down with clear examples to get you started.

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