ms-covid-19

MS in the Time of COVID-19

I wanted to write a post about what it’s like to have MS in the time of COVID-19. A pandemic that overwhelmingly affects people with underlying conditions, which MS is. Chronic disease is an underlying condition. Adding in an immunosuppressant DMT can increase the risk of not being able to fight COVID-19. 

Does this mean I have an increased chance of dying from COVID-19 if I get it?

It’s not a simple “yes” or “no.” The answer is mostly, “I don’t know, but I can point to what the experts currently say on the matter.” Then I have to do what is right for me to stay safe. 

MS and COVID-19

First things, first. I am not a healthcare worker. Nor am I in public health. My knowledge in this area is minimal. It starts and stops with the amount of research I am willing to do on the matter. Therefore, take what follows, not as a replacement for medical expert advice.

And that’s what I want to may a point of: do your research on your condition. What you find might bring small comfort. 

When I sat down and researched my risk as someone with MS, who at one point in time was on an immunosuppressant DMT, I was shocked by what I found. For the current medical research out there, I am not at an increased risk of dying from COVID-19 if I got it. If I were older or had a comorbid condition, then I would be at a higher risk of contracting and struggling to fight the illness.

Outside of the MS, I am healthy. I have asthma, which is problematic. Still, my asthma is so well under control that you could make the argument that I don’t have it (diagnosed in childhood).

But if you have MS, your MS alone will not increase your chances of not being able to fight COVID-19. It’s everything surrounding the MS that might cause issues. That is why we, as people with chronic conditions, must be vigilant in how we approach this illness. 

Listen to current guidance from reputable health organizations, like the CDCWHO, or NHS. If you live in the United States, turn off the TV during the daily press briefings. Rarely will you get useful information on how to stay safe at this time, unless it is coming from the NIAID director. It is hard science and facts that will keep us safe and get us through this. Not intuition or feelings.

This is a great resource for what you can do to stay safe while living with MS.

When I was a Statistic

I recognize that not everyone is as lucky as me with their MS or chronic illness. At the very beginning of this crisis hitting the United States, I genuinely believed I was going to die from COVID-19. I swore that my MS would be the cause of it or my DMT.

For a solid month, I believed I was the person the news referred to when they said “underlying conditions” and “immunocompromised.” I was immunocompromised while on Tecfidera. But given the side effects I experienced and the pandemic, I decided to drop the DMT. I will be speaking more to my decision, and to my neurologist, on what my next steps will be in a later post. 

During this time, I was frightened. What I was most afraid of was not the illness itself, but leaving Jai and Ash. Jai would barely have memories of his mother, and I desperately wanted him to at least remember the love I have for him. Three is much too young to lose a parent, and my fear was for him rather than myself.

Believing I was a statistic brought on additional stress and frustration. It escalated my chances of an exacerbation (though I have yet to have one). It made my emotions run all over the place. I felt out of control, and I’ve talked about how problematic that is for me before. Grouping myself into the statistics was toxic for my mental health. 

I had to reign it in for myself and my family. That’s where the research helped me have a realistic picture of my situation. It gave me the necessary tools to feel more in control and how I managed my MS moving forward. I needed to find ways to provide myself comfort.

Finding Comfort

I want to preface this section by saying I am incredibly privileged to be secure in my home, my work, my food, and my family situation. I know not everyone is as lucky as me.

So, where do I find comfort at this time?

For me, it’s staying up-to-date on the latest science. I make sure to get it from vetted, reputable sources, not opinion-based “news” sites. There is only one way to look at the pandemic, and that is through hard science. The beauty of science is that it is always evolving. It is ever-changing when it runs into a dead-end or a faulty hypothesis. It adapts and finds new answers that push everything forward. 

It is through the science that I’ve found that I don’t need to live with the same level of fear I did a month ago. It is where I found my comfort.

But that said, the science is changing so much daily that it is sometimes best to give myself a day or two break from the latest news. Some days I only look at the information in the morning and don’t bother to interact with it for a day or two. 

Instead, I’ve created schedules for myself and the family that I stick by as much as possible. I try to create some version of a routine for us to help with our mental health.

Other things I am doing that provide comfort:

  • I minimalize our interaction with the public as much as possible. I’m getting us down to grocery shopping every other week. 
  • I made masks for the whole family. I wear the mask and gloves each time I have to go shopping (I properly dispose of the gloves, in my garbage at home).
  • I social distance as much as possible on runs or walks.
  • I wash my hands for 20 seconds and avoid touching my face for the day if I’ve been out in public.

The most important activity I do is to remind myself that this is temporary and will not be forever. I view all of this as a passing situation that I have to deal with for the next few months (or years), and will ultimately be a blip in what I hope will be a long life.

Yes, it hurts to be away from friends and running buddies. Yes, it hurts not to be able to go out in public spaces whenever I want. However, I am helping those on the frontlines of this fight by not putting myself in the hospital. 

Ultimately, I do not know which way the wind will blow if I catch COVID-19. I could be asymptomatic, it could be like a bad flu. Or it could be so devastating that I do need to be put on a ventilator. I don’t know how my body will react to it if I get it. Therefore, I take this time not to be angry at the injustice of it all, and it is unjust, but to appreciate what I am getting out of it. I am getting time with my family, time to read, time to explore new hobbies, and time to learn more about myself. 

I am grateful that I can write that last sentence. I know not everyone can.

We are in a difficult time, and living with MS makes it even more challenging. But the current science says that our MS alone will not increase our chances of getting and dying from COVID-19. The comorbid conditions impact that. I hope you find the same small comfort I did when I learned this information.

Remember, continue to follow the appropriate guidelines and keep yourself safe. We are in this together, and together we will get through it.

Attention to Chronic Illness Bloggers!

The MS Mommy Blog is looking to collaborate with other chronic illness bloggers for this year. If you have a chronic illness blog and would like an opportunity to tap into the MS Mommy Blog audience, please contact me here. I look forward to hearing from you.


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Activities for a Rainy Day

What is summer without some rain?

As adults, rain can be nice because it means a cozy day inside with books, a great TV show, and delicious snacks. But for kids, rainy days are the enemy. No outdoors depending on the amount of rain and limited active games inside so the house doesn’t get destroyed.

I remember it being particularly rough when it felt like I had nothing to do. Those were the worst days where it was physically draining to think of something to do while stuck inside.

With a little one obsessed with spending time outside, it’s hard to say “no” when Jai wants to go out despite the rain. Some days I am able to accommodate him, but other days it’s storming really bad or I don’t feel getting wet myself.

Below are some activities I’ve come up with the help combat boredom on rainy days for Jai. As he gets older, the activities will evolve to be more age-appropriate and reflect his desires.

Make Rainy Days a Special Occasion

This required some planning ahead, but I have a set of toys and books that only get pulled out when we have a rainy day. It makes the day a little more special and exciting for him. It’s the same concept behind packing a special travel bag for kids that have a special set of toys – if the item is “new” to him, he will spend time playing with it rather than asking to go outside.

One such toy is an indoor bowling set. While he doesn’t understand the concept of bowling just yet, he loves rolling the ball or knocking over the pins. Jai has a vehicle that moves forward with the push of a button, so we line it up with the pins to knock them over.

It’s hilarious. For him and for us to watch his enjoyment of the game.

I also make special snacks and drinks for the day that he won’t normally get in good weather. This includes popcorn, chocolate “milk” (a coconut milk and date-sweetened drink), and herbal teas. I try to make sure they are healthy in nature, but the chocolate milk feels like a real treat for him.

Finally, I try to limit his screen time on a daily basis. Right now he’s obsessed with a song from a popular children’s movie, so I have to play that at least three times a day on a streaming site. But we try to make that the extent of his screen time. So on rainy days I will pull out his favorite PBS kids show or play the movie his favorite song is from.

The TV is a wonderful thing, but by limiting it to rainy days it becomes a treat that makes it easier to turn on and off when I need to and less of a fight when it’s time to do something different. I don’t know how long this attitude will last, but I am not taking it for granted.

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The Inevitable: Waking up in the Middle of the Night

This is the first week in a 3-week series on parenting observations. Week one is based on gentle parenting, week two is about parenting with compassion, and week three is about parenting with a disability.

These posts are based on my personal experiences as a parent and are not meant in any way to judge other parenting styles or decisions. I am offering my personal research and conclusions as possible suggestions for others out there, therefore these posts will be as objective as possible. When it comes to parenting: provided the method isn’t abusive, there really isn’t a wrong way to parent your child. Be secure and do what works best for you and your family and ignore outside judgement.


It’s one in the morning and your little one wakes up.

It seemed like everything was going well: they were sleeping through the night and now they are walking up almost nightly, for seemingly no reason.

There are plenty of posts out there on how to cope with the wake up. Tips and tricks on trying to get them back into bed and to sleep. That’s not what this post is about.

This post is for you, the caretaker, and how you manage your feelings when you’ve only had 3 hours of sleep and facing multiple hours of wakefulness while waiting for your little one to go back to sleep. How do you keep it together without getting frustrated? How do you show empathy when all you want is sleep and they won’t stop crying?

What is Gentle Parenting & Bedtime Routines?

This post is related to my week about gentle parenting. If you are just dropping in, check out my previous posts about gentle parenting and bedtime routines for more information.

Why Little Ones Wake Up

There are a variety of reasons why your little one wakes up: overtired, hungry, nightmare, or learning a new developmental skill. It’s important to identify the reason why they are waking up before going any further. Understanding what is waking a child up makes it easier to figure out how to handle the situation in your sleep-deprived stupor.

Below are some of the top reasons why a child wakes up in the middle of the night:

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Mother nursing her toddler in a rocker

Gentle Parenting and the Bedtime Routine

This is the first week in a 3-week series on parenting observations. Week one is based on gentle parenting, week two is about parenting with compassion, and week three is about parenting with a disability.

These posts are based on my personal experiences as a parent and are not meant in any way to judge other parenting styles or decisions. I am offering my personal research and conclusions as possible suggestions for others out there, therefore these posts will be as objective as possible. When it comes to parenting: provided the method isn’t abusive, there really isn’t a wrong way to parent your child. Be secure and do what works best for you and your family and ignore outside judgement.


A few days ago, I was in a text conversation with some other mothers about bedtime. What was bedtime like? How young is too young to start a routine? Why should I start a routine?

Scrolling through the conversation, there were a lot of great tips and insights shared surrounding the nature of each child’s bedtime routine and when they started having one. A common thread in the discussion: the adaptability and consistency to each routine made for an easier transition from waking to sleep.

As I was explaining Jai’s routine, I realized how important it was to his overall happiness and demeanor. I don’t pay attention to my own bedtime routine or even give myself a quality one to begin with, but Ash and I make sure that we are consistent with Jai to help him fall asleep with minimal fuss. When Jai wakes up in the morning he is chipper, refreshed, and ready to start the day.

By incorporating some gentle parenting techniques, it will create a calm atmosphere filled with mutual respect and listening by both parent and child to minimize stress and frustration by both parties.

This isn’t meant as the correct way of doing things, but merely information I’ve compiled from my own research and experience. It will hopefully provide some suggestions or ideas to build off for your own parenting experiences.

If you are dropping into this post from elsewhere, click here for more information about gentle parenting.

Creating a Consistent Bedtime Routine

There are two important aspects to the bedtime routine: the time in which the child goes to bed and the process that gets them there. Unfortunately, life gets busy and maintaining a consistent bedtime isn’t always realistic. You get home late from work, there’s a late dinner date with some friends, or time just slips by: all of these are reasons why it can be hard to maintain a consistent bedtime.

There is a lot of back and forth out there about whether there should be a consistent bedtime, and like with everything else, only you know when it is best to put your little one to bed.

There are ways to maintain a consistent routine despite changing bedtimes from day-to-day. Make sure that you have a routine that is the same every night no matter what time you start the process. What will help is if you have two similar routines that differ in length depending on how much time you can take putting the little one to bed. Jump down to “Our Personal Routine” for more information.

What does bedtime have to do with gentle parenting?

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